Fred Wah’s Poetry Connection

February 28, 2014

During his time as Parliamentary Poet Laureate, Fred Wah created a collection of resources for teachers and students of Canadian poetry. The collection features a series of videos on YouTube of poets reading their work, and accompanying PDFs that contain the poems, questions and prompts for classroom use.

Wah’s project serves as great accompaniment to the content on CanLit Guides—for example, our guide to Poetic Visuality and Experimentation. We encourage you to check out our guide and apply what you’ve learned to the poems in Wah’s Poetry Connection: Link Up with Canadian Poetry video series!


New CFP: Queer Frontiers in Canadian and Québécois Literature / Frontières queers dans la littérature québécoise et canadienne

February 26, 2014

The concept of frontier is most productive in thinking about queer experience. The spatial frontier separates the invisibility of private intimacy from the visibility of public life; the freedom and security of queer districts (for instance, the Village in Montreal, Church Street in Toronto, and Davie Street in Vancouver) from the heteronormative erasure of queer life in towns and cities throughout Canada. The border is also temporal and generational, separating childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age of those who live their queer experiences in extremely different ways. It marks queer legal status before and after same-sex marriage; queer history before and after the appearance of HIV, AIDS and tritherapies; and larger social histories before and after the sexual liberation struggles of the sixties and seventies. […more details…]

La notion de « frontière » est des plus productives afin de penser l’expérience queer. La frontière spatiale sépare l’invisibilité de l’intimité et la visibilité socio-culturelle ; la liberté et la sécurité des quartiers queers (par exemple le Village à Montréal, Church Street à Toronto et Davie Village à Vancouver) et l’oppression, le danger et l’effacement de la vie queer dans de nombreux villages et villes à travers le Canada. La frontière est aussi temporelle. Elle sépare l’enfance, l’adolescence, l’âge adulte et la vieillesse des personnes qui vivent leur expérience queer de manières fort différentes. Elle marque aussi l’histoire queer avant le droit au mariage de personnes de même sexe, et après ; avant la trithérapie contre le VIH, et après ; avant l’apparition du sida, et après ; avant les luttes de libération sexuelle des années 60 et 70, et après. […plus de détails…]


New Issue: Of Borders and Bioregions #218 (Autumn 2013)

February 20, 2014

Cover of CanLit 218

CanLit 218: Of Borders and Bioregions

Canadian Literature’s Issue 218 (Winter 2013), Of Borders and Bioregions, is now available to order. The issue is led by Acting Editor Laura Moss’ timely editorial, “”Sustaining the Humanities,”” which uses an ecological model to work through major issues facing the humanities in higher education:

What if, instead of thinking of the humanities as in a state of crisis as we so often do, we think of the humanities as an ecosystem that is failing to thrive? How do we sustain the humanities as part of a system of diverse communities both within universities and in the public arena? In the face of the resource undernourishment, how can we prosper?
—Laura Moss, “”Sustaining the Humanities””

Issue 218 also features articles by Vinh Nguyen, Mariam Pirbhai, Rachel Bower, Maude Lapierre, J. I. Little, and David Williams. As always, we bring you new Canadian poetry—from Weyman Chan, David Eso, Armand Garnet Ruffo, Derek Webster, Julie Paul, and Stephen Matthew Brown—and book reviews.

Head over to our online store to order a copy of this great issue!


Mavis Gallant, 1922–2014

February 19, 2014

Cover of CanLit 93

CanLit 93

Celebrated Canadian writer Mavis Gallant passed away yesterday at the age of 91. Gallant, who spent most of her career in Paris, France, was best known for short stories but also wrote novels, plays, and essays. In 1981, Gallant won the Governor General’s Award in fiction for her collection Home Truths: Selected Canadian Stories and was named to the Order of Canada.

Despite living most of her life outside of Canada, Gallant’s work received much critical attention in the pages of Canadian Literature. Here is a list of all articles, reviews of Gallant’s works, and reviews of scholarship on Gallant’s writing published in Canadian Literature:

Articles

Book Reviews of Mavis Gallant’s Works

Reviews of Scholarship on Mavis Gallant’s Work


First Nations Public Library Week: February 10–15, 2014

February 13, 2014

Cover of CanLit 215

CanLit 215: Indigenous Focus

This week is First Nations Public Library Week in Ontario. The theme this year is “Celebrating Mother Earth.”

Our open-access classroom resource, CanLit Guides, has a guide to Indigenous Literatures in Canada—it’s a great resource for instructors, students, and anyone who wants to learn more about the complicated relationship between colonialism, culture, and language.

The guide features chapters on Tomson Highway’s The Rez Sisters, Thomas King’s Green Grass, Running Water, Eden Robinson’s Monkey Beach, and much more.


#readwomen2014

February 5, 2014

CanLit Guides Logo

CanLit Guides

Are you reading women authors in 2014?

Writer and artist Joanna Walsh’s Twitter hashtag #readwomen2014 has gone viral, encouraging readers worldwide to share their favourite women authors. Walsh’s campaign picks up on studies by organizations such as CWILA (Canadian Women in the Literary Arts) and VIDA that have found that far more books written by men are reviewed than ones written by women. The #readwomen2014 hashtag has sparked a lively online conversation about the role of gender in literary representation. CBC Books got into the fray with their list of 10 Canadian women you need to read, which includes writers such as Eden Robinson.

CanLit Guides has lots of content to help contextualize debates around gender and literature, starting with our Gender, Sexuality, and Canadian Literature guide. The guide contains primers on academic theories about on topics such as feminism, sexuality, performativity, and their relationship to literature. For example, we have a chapter on Feminist History of Literature and Culture in Canada, which examines the waves metaphor of feminism and the history of feminist literary culture in Canada. Our page on CWILA helps contextualize the debate about gender and literary representation from a Canadian perspective.

We also have plenty of literary case studies on work written by Canadian women authors:

As well, our Poetic Visuality and Experimentation guide features poetry by Canadian women poets M. Travis Lane and Rita Wong.

Explore CanLit Guides for lots more content on Canadian women writers!

CanLit Guides is a flexible learning resource, developed by Canadian Literature, that introduces students to academic reading and writing. The guides use articles from Canadian Literature’s online archive, helping students navigate scholarly conversations surrounding Canadian Literature.