Author Spotlights

House, Home, Hospitality: Author Spotlight – Pauline Peters

May 30, 2019

Pauline Peters is a writer who works for the Toronto Public Library. She has written and published short stories and poems as well as having had plays produced. Her main writing interests include myths, women, race, and the natural world.

Her poem “Guardians” can be read on our website at https://canlit.ca/article/guardians/.

Canadian Literature issue 237, House, Home, Hospitality, is available to order through our online store.


House, Home, Hospitality: Author Spotlight – Alix Shield

May 23, 2019

Alix Shield is a PhD Candidate and settler scholar in the Department of English at Simon Fraser University. Her research uses contemporary digital humanities methods to analyze collaboratively authored twentieth- and twenty-first-century Indigenous literatures in Canada, and is primarily focused on E. Pauline Johnson’s and Chief Joe and Mary Capilano’s 1911 text Legends of Vancouver. Alix is also a Research Assistant for Dr. Deanna Reder’s “The People and the Text” SSHRC-funded project, and the recipient of an SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship for her doctoral work.

 

Article Abstract

In a 1989 interview, Métis author Maria Campbell complained to Hartmut Lutz that a section of her autobiography, Halfbreed, first published in 1973, was removed by the publisher against her wishes. During a chance meeting with Campbell in Dublin in 2017, and following Indigenous protocols, Deanna Reder and Alix Shield asked her for permission to search for early versions of Campbell’s text. With Campbell’s blessing, Alix Shield conducted an archival search for any early material, and discovered the excised passage that revealed that when Campbell was a teenager, she had been raped by RCMP officers. This article includes the found text and discusses the impact of its excision.

Canadian Literature issue 237, House, Home, Hospitality, is available to order through our online store.


House, Home, Hospitality: Author Spotlight – Deanna Reder

May 16, 2019

Deanna Reder (Cree/Métis) is an Associate Professor in the Departments of First Nations Studies and English at Simon Fraser University, where she teaches courses in Indigenous popular fiction and Canadian Indigenous literatures, especially autobiography. She is Principal Investigator of a five-year SSHRC-funded project for 2015-2020 called “The People and the Text: Indigenous Writing in Northern North America up to 1992.” She has co-edited several anthologies including Troubling Tricksters (2010), Learn, Teach, Challenge (2016), and Read, Listen, Tell (2017). The most recent is Honouring the Strength of Indian Women, a collection of the plays, stories, and poetry of Vera Manuel, forthcoming from the University of Manitoba Press.

 

Article Abstract

In a 1989 interview, Métis author Maria Campbell complained to Hartmut Lutz that a section of her autobiography, Halfbreed, first published in 1973, was removed by the publisher against her wishes. During a chance meeting with Campbell in Dublin in 2017, and following Indigenous protocols, Deanna Reder and Alix Shield asked her for permission to search for early versions of Campbell’s text. With Campbell’s blessing, Alix Shield conducted an archival search for any early material, and discovered the excised passage that revealed that when Campbell was a teenager, she had been raped by RCMP officers. This article includes the found text and discusses the impact of its excision.

Canadian Literature issue 237, House, Home, Hospitality, is available to order through our online store.


Lost and Found: Author Spotlight – Sara Mang

April 16, 2019

Originally from Labrador, Sara Mang’s prose and poetry have appeared or are forthcoming in The New Quarterly, Room, Carve Magazine, CV2, and other journals. Since 2017, her work has been a finalist for numerous awards including The New Quarterly’s Peter Hinchcliff Award, The Lorian Hemingway Short Story Competition, The Malahat Review’s Far Horizons Award, and the Bristol Short Story Prize. An alumni of the Disquiet International Literary Program in Lisbon, Portugal, Sara is an editorial board member at PRISM International and an MFA student at the University of British Columbia. She lives in Cornwall, Ontario with her husband, three children, and rabbit.

Her poem “Pithy” can be read here.

Canadian Literature issue 236, Lost and Found, is available to order through our online store.


Lost and Found: Author Spotlight – Angeline Schellenberg

April 9, 2019

Anthony Mark Photography

Angeline Schellenberg is the author of Tell Them It Was Mozart (Brick Books, 2016), a collection about raising children on the autism spectrum. It received the Lansdowne Prize for Poetry, the Eileen McTavish Sykes Award for Best First Book, and the John Hirsch Award for Most Promising Manitoba Writer, and was shortlisted for a ReLit Award. She follows up on Roads of Stone (Alfred Gustav Press, 2015) with two new chapbooks in 2019: Irises (Dancing Girl Press) and Dented Tubas (Kalamalka Press). Angeline is a copy editor living in Treaty 1 Territory (Winnipeg) with her husband, their two teenagers, and a German shepherd-corgi.

Her poem “Sunset on Deep Bay” can be read here.

Canadian Literature issue 236, Lost and Found, is available to order through our online store.


Lost and Found: Author Spotlight – Heather Macfarlane

April 2, 2019

Heather Macfarlane is Assistant Adjunct Professor at Queen’s University in Kingston. Her work focuses on Canadian and Indigenous literatures, and she has published on road narratives, Indigenous language in theatre, comparative anglo- and francophone literature, and Canadian and Indigenous nationhood. Her book on the road narrative is forthcoming from University of Ottawa Press.

 

Article Abstract

The release in 2015 of the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission examining Canada’s Residential School system coincided with the lead-up to the 50th anniversary of the tragic death of Chanie Wenjack, who died trying to escape residential school in 1966. Migmaw singer Willie Dunn’s 1971 song “Charlie Wenjack” and Stó:lōwriter Lee Maracle’s 1976/1990 short story “Charlie” ensured that the story remained in circulation in Indigenous communities, and after the release of the final report of the TRC, Canadian musician Gord Downie and author Joseph Boyden re-invigorated the story and introduced it to Canadians with their own versions of the tragedy. While Dunn and Maracle use strategies of resistance common to the protest movements of the ‘60s and ‘70s to tell Wenjack’s story, Downie and Boyden use strategies of affect to reach their audiences. All four artists are clearly working for change, but what the tellings of the stories ultimately serve to illustrate are two conflicting approaches to reconciliation—the first promoting Indigenous subjectivity, and the second Canadian nationhood.

Canadian Literature issue 236, Lost and Found, is available to order through our online store.


Lost and Found: Author Spotlight – Franco Cortese

March 26, 2019

Franco Cortese is an experimental poet living in Thorold, Ontario. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Canadian Literature, The Capilano Review, filling Station, ditch, and others. His recent chapbooks include aeiou (No Press, 2018), uoiea (above/ground press, 2019), teksker (Simulacrum Press, 2019), The Thorny Inane (Grey Borders Books, forthcoming), and Ash Into Brick (Grey Borders Books, forthcoming). He also has leaflets, booklets, nanopamphlets, and broadsheets published or forthcoming through The Blasted Tree, Penteract Press, and Spacecraft Press. His work has been published both within Canada and internationally, most recently in the anthology Concrete and Constraint (Penteract Press 2018).

His poem “Il Aqua” can be read here.

Canadian Literature issue 236, Lost and Found, is available to order through our online store.


Lost and Found: Author Spotlight – Andre Furlani

March 19, 2019

Andre Furlani is Professor and Chair of the Department of English, Concordia University, and the author of Beckett after Wittgenstein and Guy Davenport: Postmodern and After. Recent publications on modern and contemporary comparative literature have appeared in PMLA, Modernism/modernity, Philosophy and Literature, and Bréac, as well as in Speaking Memory: How Translation Shapes City Life and The Oxford History of the Classical Reception in English Literature.

 

Article Abstract

Because it is a particularly dense, varied, and vigorously contested social imaginary, Montreal gives rise to uneven geographies and spatial instabilities that its pedestrian writers nimbly tread and transform. Montreal’s contemporary literary flâneurs and flâneuses are not blasé loiterers but gregarious foragers on the prowl for the composite character of a polyglot city that defies subordination to a unifying social script. Diversely situated in terms of class, race, ethnicity, gender, and language, the French and English novels of Leonard Cohen, Rawi Hage, Gail Scott, André Carpentier, Peter Dubé, and Hugh Hood trace altered paths of civic participation, where personal freedoms and group obligations intersect and, just as freely, disentangle and separate. Transient assembly, rather than institutional partisan affiliation, becomes a pedestrian mode of political agility. While they are anonymous, unsponsored and free subjects on the bummel from the encroachments of social identity and State categories, equally the strollers of Beautiful Losers, Cockroach, Heroine, Ruelles, The City’s Gates, and Around the Mountain belong to an informal civilian sentinel that, relying on the provision of public works, patrols the city’s liberties and modifies its contours. These peripatetic texts reveal that the public third spaces of casual encounter are not confined strictly to determinate sites but are as fluid and situational as the languages employed there. They not only “note while loitering” (the meaning of Carpentier’s portmanteau verb flânoter) but also help modify Montreal in a stealthy guerrilla urbanism that is remaking the contemporary North American city. And in the process they overstep narrative conventions.

Canadian Literature issue 236, Lost and Found, is available to order through our online store.


Lost and Found: Author Spotlight – A. F. Moritz

March 12, 2019

A. F. Moritz’s most recent books are The Sparrow: Selected Poems (2018) and two from 2015, Sequence: a Poem, and the republication by Princeton University Press of his 1986 book, The Tradition. His poetry has received the Griffin Poetry Prize, the Guggenheim Fellowship, the Award in Literature of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and has appeared in many editions of the annual anthologies The Best Canadian Poetry and The Best American Poetry.

His poem “Oh Sunflower” can be read here.

Canadian Literature issue 236, Lost and Found, is available to order through our online store.


Lost and Found: Author Spotlight – Ryan Fitzpatrick

March 5, 2019

Ryan Fitzpatrick recently completed a PhD at Simon Fraser University and is currently a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto Scarborough. He is the author of two books of poetry: Fortified Castles (Talonbooks, 2014) and Fake Math (Snare, 2007). With Jonathan Ball, he edited Why Poetry Sucks: An Anthology of Humorous Experimental Canadian Poetry (Insomniac, 2014). With Deanna Fong and Janey Dodd, he worked on the Fred Wah Digital Archive.

 

Article Abstract

In this article, I read the poetry of Lisa Robertson and Mercedes Eng, both of whom stage, confront, and critique the capitalist and colonial processes that stabilize and destabilize the material relations that compose Vancouver in the twenty-first century. As processes, stabilization and destabilization involve both the ways a space is subject to change and the ways that individual actors can affect those changes. Both Robertson and Eng respond to a city that is repeatedly hailed both as one of the world’s most livable cities and as one of the most unaffordable—a city of condos and cranes, scaffolds, and tent encampments. When we read Robertson’s and Eng’s texts together, a potent tension emerges between the theoretical possibilities and material realities of instability—a tension that can help us think through the potentials of poetry to transform spaces and spatial relations.

Canadian Literature issue 236, Lost and Found, is available to order through our online store.