Author Spotlights

Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings Author Spotlight – Shane Neilson

December 23, 2019

Photo credit to Mina Da Costa

Shane Neilson is a poet originally from the Maritimes. He completed his affect trilogy upon publication of Dysphoria (PQL) in 2017, which won the Hamilton Arts Council Book Award. His most recent book is New Brunswick (Biblioasis). In the Fall of this year, Shane published Margin of Interest (PQL), a book of literary criticism on the English language poetry of the Maritime region, and Constructive Negativity, a book of literary criticism on the intersection of prize culture and disability.

His poem “The Death-Trick” can be read on our website at canlit.ca/article/the-death-trick.

Canadian Literature issue 238, Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings, is available to order through our online store.


Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings Author Spotlight – Kristiana Karathanassis

December 16, 2019

Kristiana Karathanassis is former Associate of Huron University College’s Centre for Undergraduate Research Learning (CURL). Her work has appeared in Liberated Arts: A Journal for Undergraduate Research at Huron, and in the 2017 Undergraduate Awards series of Scholarship@Western. She is a recipient of the SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship (Master’s), and is pursuing a Master’s degree in English at the University of Western Ontario.

 

Article (co-authored with Andrea King)
“Language and Loss in Michel Rabagliati’s Paul à Québec and Sarah Leavitt’s Tangles

Abstract
A decline in verbal and written language ability is an early symptom and an inevitable outcome of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as an eventual result of other degenerative illnesses like cancer. In this article, we analyze two graphic novels—Michel Rabagliati’s Paul à Québec (2009) and Sarah Leavitt’s Tangles: A Story about Alzheimer’s, My Mother and Me (2010)—that challenge the notion that the loss of linguistic capacity due to illness corresponds to a loss of identity. Foregrounding the ways in which language is deployed or withheld at the structural and thematic level of these autobiographical comics, we argue that the hybrid medium is useful for ordering and coping with the isolating experience of illness for sufferers and caregivers at moments when language alone is insufficient, and allows them to express themselves and connect with others beyond words when language fails completely.

Canadian Literature issue 238, Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings, is available to order through our online store.


Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings Author Spotlight – Andrea King

December 9, 2019

Andrea King is Associate Professor of French at Huron University College in London, Ontario, where she teaches language, literature, and comics. Her articles on Canadian and Quebec fiction have appeared in journals such as Canadian Literature, Les Cahiers Anne Hébert, and Atlantis. She has a particular interest in mentoring undergraduate researchers and is a founding Associate of Huron’s Centre for Undergraduate Research Learning (CURL).

 

Article (co-authored with Kristiana Karathanassis)
“Language and Loss in Michel Rabagliati’s Paul à Québec and Sarah Leavitt’s Tangles

Abstract
A decline in verbal and written language ability is an early symptom and an inevitable outcome of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as an eventual result of other degenerative illnesses like cancer. In this article, we analyze two graphic novels—Michel Rabagliati’s Paul à Québec (2009) and Sarah Leavitt’s Tangles: A Story about Alzheimer’s, My Mother and Me (2010)—that challenge the notion that the loss of linguistic capacity due to illness corresponds to a loss of identity. Foregrounding the ways in which language is deployed or withheld at the structural and thematic level of these autobiographical comics, we argue that the hybrid medium is useful for ordering and coping with the isolating experience of illness for sufferers and caregivers at moments when language alone is insufficient, and allows them to express themselves and connect with others beyond words when language fails completely.

Canadian Literature issue 238, Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings, is available to order through our online store.


Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings Author Spotlight – John Donlan

December 2, 2019

John Donlan’s collections of poetry are Domestic Economy, Baysville, Green Man, Spirit Engine, Call Me the Breeze, and Out All Day. He is an editor with Brick Books, and was the 2012-2013 Barbara Moon Editorial Fellow at Massey College, University of Toronto, the 2014-2015 Writer in Residence at Saskatoon Public Library, and the 2016-2017 Haig-Brown Writer in Residence in Campbell River.

His poem “The Muscle Motor Molecule Myosin” can be read on our website at canlit.ca/article/the-muscle-motor-molecule-myosin.

Canadian Literature issue 238, Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings, is available to order through our online store.


Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings Author Spotlight – Ana María Fraile-Marcos

November 25, 2019

Ana María Fraile-Marcos is Associate Professor at the University of Salamanca, where she teaches English Canadian and Postcolonial literatures. She is the Director of the USAL Master’s in Creative Writing and the Head of the English Department. Her publications include Global Narratives of Resilience (Routledge, 2020), Literature and the Glocal City: Reshaping the English Canadian Imaginary (Routledge, 2014), Planteamientos estéticos y políticos en la obra de Zora Neale Hurston (U de Valencia, 2003), Richard Wright’s Native Son (Rodopi, 2007), and numerous chapters and articles in peer-reviewed journals. She is the Principal Investigator of the research project “Narratives of Resilience” (FFI2015-63895-C2-2-R).

 

Article
“‘Who’s going to look after the river?’ Water and the Ethics of Care in Thomas King’s The Back of the Turtle”

Abstract
This paper analyses the trope of water in Thomas King’s latest novel The Back of the Turtle from an ethics-of-care perspective that puts in conversation Indigenous ethics, feminist care ethics, and environmental ethics. I suggest that King’s focus on water offers a harsh—even if often humorous—critique of the anthropocentric, neoliberal extractivist mentality while proposing a transcultural ethics of care. Consequently, my analysis of the novel draws on the dialogue taking place in the realm of the Environmental Humanities in Canada and beyond about the centrality of water (See Cecilia Chen, Janine MacLeod and Astrida Neimais’ Thinking with Water; Dorothy Christian and Rita Wong’s Downstream: Reimagining Water; Astrida Neimanis’ Bodies of Water: Posthuman Feminist Phenomenology; Stacy Alaimo’s Exposed: Environmental Politics and Pleasures in Posthuman Times), as well as on Indigenous epistemologies that eschew anthropocentrism in favour of attentive caring for the interconnected needs of humans and non-humans within interdependent ecologies, and feminist environmental care ethics that emphasize the importance of empowering communities to care for themselves and the ecologies that sustain them.

Canadian Literature issue 238, Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings, is available to order through our online store.


Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings Author Spotlight – Jake Kennedy

November 18, 2019

Jake Kennedy’s poetry has appeared in The Malahat Review, The Awl, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and Best American Experimental Writing. He is also the author of three collections of poetry: The Lateral (Snare Books), Apollinaire’s Speech to the War Medic (BookThug), and Merz Structure No. 2 Burnt by Children at Play (BookThug). He is also the recipient of the Robin Blaser Award, the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Writing, and the bpNichol Chapbook Award. His most recent book—published by OPR Books out of NYU—is entitled Made Line Sing and it’s an entirely made-up biography of NYC poet-architect Madeline Gins.

His poem “Landscape” can be read on our website at canlit.ca/article/landscape.

Canadian Literature issue 238, Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings, is available to order through our online store.


Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings Author Spotlight – Anna Branach-Kallas

November 10, 2019

Anna Branach-Kallas is Associate Professor in the Department of English at Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland. Her research interests include the representation of trauma and war, postcolonialism, health humanities, and comparative studies. She has published several books, including, most recently, Comparing Grief in French, British and Canadian Great War Fiction (1977-2014) (Brill-Rodopi, 2018), co-authored with Piotr Sadkowski. Her earlier monograph in Polish, Uraz przetrwania [The Trauma of Survival: The (De)Construction of the Myth of the Great War in the Canadian Novel] (NCU, 2014), was awarded a Pierre Savard Award by the International Council for Canadian Studies.

 

Article
“Trauma Plots: Reading Contemporary Canadian First World War Fiction in a Comparative Perspective”

Abstract
The purpose of this article is to examine selected WWI Canadian novels published in the last forty years in relation to a transnational trauma paradigm. My contention is that, similarly to much contemporary British, French, Irish, and Australian Great War fiction, the dominant theme of recent Canadian Great War novels is war trauma and its aftermath. Referring to the concepts of post-memory, wound culture, and trauma studies, I discuss various representations of suffering in Canadian WWI literature, such as the anxieties of shell shocked soldiers, survivor guilt, the distress of women, as well as the individual and collective wounds of colonized groups. Exploring the ethics and aesthetics of Canadian trauma plots, I also draw analogies with other national literatures. In conclusion, the article attempts to highlight the distinctive features of Canadian war literature by showing at the same time how it inscribes itself within certain transnational trends.

Canadian Literature issue 238, Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings, is available to order through our online store.


Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings Author Spotlight – Chris Johnson

November 4, 2019

Chris Johnson is the Managing Editor for Arc Poetry Magazine. His recent chapbooks include Listen, Partisan! (Frog Hollow Press, 2016) and Gravenhurst (above/ground press, 2019).

His poem “Publication; after Artie Gold” can be read on our website at canlit.ca/article/publication-after-artie-gold.

Canadian Literature issue 238, Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings, is available to order through our online store.


Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings Author Spotlight – Simona Bertacco

October 28, 2019

Simona Bertacco is Associate Professor of Postcolonial Studies and Director of the Humanities Graduate Studies at the University of Louisville. She is the author of Out of Place: The Writings of Robert Kroetsch (Lang, 2002), as well as of several articles on Kroetsch’s poetry. Her most recent publications include Language and Translation in Postcolonial Literatures: Multilingual Contexts, Translational Texts (Routledge, 2014); Between Virtuosity and Despair: Formal Experimentation in Diaspora Tales” (Journal of Postcolonial Writing, 2014); and the special issue of The New Centennial Review: Translation and the Global Humanities (vol. 16, no. 1, 2016).

 

Article
“Rescaling Robert Kroetsch: A Reading across Communities, Borders, and Practices”

Abstract
A lot has been written on Robert Kroetsch in Canada and in Europe, throughout the past half a century, but curiously not in the United States. Reflecting on the possible reasons why Kroetsch is not better-known, more famous and influential in American literature is of import in this essay, since so much of Kroetsch’s poetry organically aligns with the movements and poetic practices across the border. This paper will look at three communities deemed essential to understand Kroetsch’s poetry: the first steps of a postmodern community in North America as a cross-border community, given to the exploration of new forms of thinking art and activism in the Vietnam War years and coalescing around the journal Boundary 2; the Canadian Prairies and the network of writers with whom Kroetsch was in constant dialogue throughout his career; and the “transgeographic network” (Beach) of North American postmodern poets, influenced by the lesson of Charles Olson, that offers a new way of reading Kroetsch today by situating him within a wider intellectual ensemble.

Canadian Literature issue 238, Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings, is available to order through our online store.


Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings Author Spotlight – Catherine Owen

October 21, 2019

Photo credit to Monique de St-Croix

Catherine Owen was born and raised in Vancouver and now lives in a 1905 home in Edmonton. She is the author of 15 titles of poetry and prose, including Riven, poems out from ECW, and Locations of Grief: An Emotional Geography, a memoir anthology Wolsak & Wynn is publishing in 2020. She works in film props, writes poetry reviews, and sings for the band Doom Cowboy.

Her poem “Sonnet on First Seeing It” can be read on our website at canlit.ca/article/sonnet-on-first-seeing-it.

Canadian Literature issue 238, Rescaling CanLit: Global Readings, is available to order through our online store.