Articles



‘All Voices Belong to Me’: An Interview with Neil Bissoondath
Abstract: Neil Bissoondath, born in Trinidad in 1955, emigrated to Canada when he was eighteen. Since his arrival, he has built ...

‘Big About Green’: The Ecopoetry of Earle Birney
Abstract: The poetry of Canadian modernist Earle Birney presents a relationship between humanity and the natural world that is fraught with tension, conflict and destruction. Taking nine emblematic poems into consideration, and their occasionally extensive revisions, Birney’s work on the environment emerges as more than passive, observant nature poetry, but rather, as a deeply politicized, ecological polemic that laments the destruction wrought by modern, industrial development. Furthermore, his extensive revisions of a number of the earliest poems in question often function to highlight their ecological and environmentalist ethos.

‘But How Do You Write A Chagall?’
Abstract: “Remembering the Strait of Belle Isle or some northerly harbor of Labrador, before hebecame a schoolteacher a great-uncle painted a ...

‘Gently Scan’
Abstract: I’ESSIE GEORGINA SIME (1868-1958) — a gender-neutral ‘J.G. Sime’ on the title page of her books and J. Georgina Sime ...

‘Lectures’ Publiques à Québec au Dix-Neuvième Siècle
Abstract: СÍHAQUE ÉPOQUE,” ESTIME Tzvetan Todorov, “a son propre système de genres, qui est en rapport avec l’idéologie dominante . . ...

‘Sri Lankan’ Canadian Poets
Abstract: M,ЛСНАЕЬ ONDAATJE’S Running in the Family has been characterized by an American reviewer as “a kind of travel book,”1 and ...

‘The Empathetic Imagination’: An Interview with Yann Martel
Abstract: To date, Yann Martel has published three books: The Facts Behind the Helsinki Roccamatios (1993), a collection of short stories awarded ...

“A Book that All Canadians Should Be Proud to Read”: Canada Reads and Joseph Boyden’s Three Day Road
Abstract: In this paper, I examine the responses of readers to Joseph Boyden’s Three Day Road in light of its appearance on Canada Reads, particularly in relation to the CBC’s paratextual framing of the novel and the way it was discussed by the panellists in the 2006 iteration of the programme. I explore the clash of reading practices that emerge, and suggest that although there is no easy separation to be made between groups of readers, there is value in exploring how, and why, different interpretive modes emerge, particularly in a context where narratives of national history and identity are at stake. Finally, I seek to locate Canada Reads in the wider cultural field by contextualizing it in relation to other debates about literary value, such as Frankfurt School objections to mass culture and Virginia Woolf’s aversion to the middlebrow.

“A Foreign Presence in the Stall”
Abstract: i. ForeignPresences The title for this paper finds its origin in a short story called “Squatter” by South-Asian-Canadian writer Rohinton ...

“A Little Acid is Absolutely Necessary”
Abstract: As “COQUETTE OF THE FIRST ORDER,” Anne Wilmot in Frances Brooke’s The History of Julia Mandeville (1762) prefigures the central ...