Articles



Ballantyne and the Fur Traders
Abstract: ABOY’S CANADA, or, Recollections of a Company Man in Retirement, might be the facetious title of an essay on that ...

Baseball and the Canadian Imagination
Abstract: WHEN ι WAS A STUDENT at the University of British Columbia I got involved in all the arts I could, ...

Basmati Rice
Abstract: M STUDY is ON THE SECOND FLOOR of our house and faces East. I like that and I get up ...

Bastard Bohemia
Abstract: Iτ is DIFFICULT, in an age when most of the fine arts are taught on campus, to keep patience with ...

Battles with the Trolls
Abstract: THE ASSERTION OF Magnus Eisengrim near the conclusion of The Manticore, “IЖaНmЕ what I have made myself,” and Liesl’s postulate ...

Behind the Powderworks
Abstract: Some time in the fall of 1946, when she was working on the English translation of Bonheur d’occasion for the ...

Bell Island Ballads
Abstract: IN 1895 large scale mining of iron ore was started at Bell Island, Conception Bay, Newfoundland. This mining venture, which ...

Bestiare et carnaval dans la fiction ferronienne
Abstract: “Je reprends à ma façon le discours de l’âne à son ânier: “Ah misérable! s’écria le dit âne, si je ...

Between The Intervals
Abstract: In his long poem The Intervals, Stuart Mackinnon defines the presence of time, or the absence of time, through the ...

Beyond Comparison: Reading Relations between Indigenous Nations
Abstract: While much has been said about the supposed tensions between literary nationalist and cosmopolitanist approaches to Indigenous literary scholarship, much less attention has been devoted to imagining how, in literary critical practice, scholars might formulate reading methods that mobilize the important insights of Native literary nationalism for the project of reading what Māori scholar Alice Te Punga Somerville calls “Indigenous-Indigenous encounter[s]” (Somerville “The Lingering” 23). The objective of this essay is to derive one possible methodological approach from Indigenous literature itself while engaging with Indigenous scholarship along the way. By reading Indigenous literature for what it teaches about critical methods, I seek to translate Native literary nationalism’s call for prioritizing Indigenous knowledges and methods into a reading practice that attends carefully to how Indigenous literary texts articulate, on their own terms, interactions with other Indigenous communities. An attention to such interactions may, in turn, contribute to the most inclusive versions of Native literary nationalism, demonstrating how distinct, local forms of Indigenous nationhood may be strengthened and enriched, rather than diluted, through exchanges across diverse Indigenous cultures. Reading relations between Indigenous nations thus opens pathways to other worlds of belonging breathed to life in Indigenous stories.