Articles



Ballantyne and the Fur Traders
Abstract: ABOY’S CANADA, or, Recollections of a Company Man in Retirement, might be the facetious title of an essay on that ...

Baseball and the Canadian Imagination
Abstract: WHEN ι WAS A STUDENT at the University of British Columbia I got involved in all the arts I could, ...

Basmati Rice
Abstract: M STUDY is ON THE SECOND FLOOR of our house and faces East. I like that and I get up ...

Bastard Bohemia
Abstract: Iτ is DIFFICULT, in an age when most of the fine arts are taught on campus, to keep patience with ...

Battles with the Trolls
Abstract: THE ASSERTION OF Magnus Eisengrim near the conclusion of The Manticore, “IЖaНmЕ what I have made myself,” and Liesl’s postulate ...

Behind the Powderworks
Abstract: Some time in the fall of 1946, when she was working on the English translation of Bonheur d’occasion for the ...

Bell Island Ballads
Abstract: IN 1895 large scale mining of iron ore was started at Bell Island, Conception Bay, Newfoundland. This mining venture, which ...

Bestiare et carnaval dans la fiction ferronienne
Abstract: “Je reprends à ma façon le discours de l’âne à son ânier: “Ah misérable! s’écria le dit âne, si je ...

Between The Intervals
Abstract: In his long poem The Intervals, Stuart Mackinnon defines the presence of time, or the absence of time, through the ...

Beyond Generic Hybridity: Nalo Hopkinson and the Politics of Science Fiction
Abstract: This paper studies the politics of genre surrounding Nalo Hopkinson’s novel Brown Girl in the Ring (1998). Scholarship has widely understood the novel through the lens of generic hybridity—as a hybrid of various genres within and around the speculative fiction title (science fiction, fantasy, magic realism, fabulist fiction, and dystopian and utopian literatures). Generic hybridity has been a useful framework through which to study the novel, but it does not necessarily help account for the ways in which the text can be situated comfortably within the genre of science fiction. This paper argues that the consequences of this scholarly focus, this hesitancy to view Hopkinson’s writing as straightforwardly science fiction, are that such canonization judgments keep science fiction from becoming more epistemologically varied. Redressing the significance of the novel’s technoscientific components, and arguing that the novel’s heart transplant storyline can be read as a commentary on the politics of genre outlined here, this paper seeks to demonstrate the value in and implications of reading Brown Girl in the Ring as science fiction. The paper also addresses the proposals of other scholars who seek to relieve these fraught politics through new genres, and it suggests that any productive transformation might best occur within the form and title of science fiction itself.