Articles



F. R. Scott and Some of His Poems
Abstract: 1N FRANK SCOTT we have a figure whom some Carlyle of Canada’s second century might write about as The Hero ...

Failed Futurity: Performing Abortion in Merrill Denison’s Marsh Hay
Abstract: Merrill Denison’s Marsh Hay culminates with the “piercing scream” of a pregnant woman as she intentionally miscarries. Originally published in 1923, the play did not see the stage until over fifty years later. This unique delay in production was likely due to the play’s sensitive themes, namely, pregnancy out of wedlock and abortion. Most critics focus on Marsh Hay’s dramatization of rural poverty and overlook the abortion. Ultimately, the play’s depiction of poverty and lost pregnancy are mutually constitutive because abortion functions as a symbol and symptom of the family’s failed futurity. Denison uses lost pregnancy to foretell the demise not only of an archetypal rural family but also of rural Canada if audiences do not accept pregnancy out of wedlock. I argue that Denison’s progressive conception of illegitimate pregnancy is constrained by the play’s use of abortion as a punishment for the community’s refusal to accept pregnancy out of wedlock.

Faith and Fiction: Hugh MacLennan’s “The Watch That Ends the Night”
Abstract: τLHERE IS AN INHERENT TENSION, even conflict, between ДНЕ: faith and fiction. The modern realistic novel has a professed mimetic ...

Fallacies about Art
Abstract: The Literary Lawren Harris “Painters are a bore because most of them would have you believe they are philoso- phers ...

Fanged Nationalisms: Vampires and Contamination in Suzette Mayr’s Venous Hum
Abstract: In a review of Suzette Mayr’s Venous Hum, Mridula Chakraborty laments that the Alberta novel, which satirizes a number of assumptions concerning racial, sexual, regional, and national identities, is ruined by Mayr’s “unexpected, and completely unnecessary, horror pin” (36). Mayr indeed deploys vampires, cannibals, and undead people in this novel, and while Chakraborty believes that the intervention of these monstrous figures prevents the full development of the satire, I argue that Mayr’s use of magic realism intensifies her thorough critique of Canadian nationalism.

Fantômes du passé chez Émile Ollivier et Gérard Étienne: de l’écriture comme exorcisme
Abstract: L’œuvre romanesque d’Émile Ollivier et de Gérard Étienne tire ses motifs et ses thèmes de deux traumas qui sont dans rapport de cause à effet : la dictature et l’exil. Le passé douloureux des deux romanciers  déploie dans leurs textes ses fantômes et ses hantises dont la puissance obsédante semble inépuisable. À cet effet, l’écriture est pour eux  un rituel  d’exorcisme qui tente de donner forme et corps à l’informe, non pas pour chasser ce passé, mais pour le rendre accessible au logos et, ainsi, en atténuer le potentiel macabre. L’omniprésence spectrale du passé prend diverses dans l’œuvre des deux écrivains : désir du retour au pays natal mais en même temps impossible retour chez Émile Ollivier; hallucinations chez Étienne,  folie et cauchemars chez les deux. Le but de cet article est d’analyser la présence de ces  figures mémoratives dans quelques romans des auteurs susmentionnés.

Fathers and Sons
Abstract: A RECENT ARTICLE by Ronald Sutherland, “The Calvin- 1 ist-Jansenist Pantomime,” compares English- and French-Canadian literatures as reflectors of Puritanical ...

Faust and Under the Volcano
Abstract: ΤIHE BEST INTRODUCTION to any critical study of Under the IHE Volcano is Lowry’s “Preface to a Novel”, as presented ...

Felix, Elsa, André Gide and Others: Some Unpublished Letters of F. P. Greve
Abstract: [Ν 1976 DESMOND PACEY, with the assistance of J. C. Mahanti, published The Letters of Frederick Philip Grovel In an ...

Fiction in Atlantic Canada
Abstract: IN HIS INTRODUCTION to The Portrait of a Lady, Henry James analyses the problem of objective value in the subject ...