Articles



I Just See Myself as an Old-Fashioned Storyteller: A Conversation with Drew Hayden Taylor
Abstract: Sandy Tait (): Can you give us a rundown on where you came from, and how you got to be ...

I Want Edge
Abstract: KRUK: I’d like to start by talking a bit about the short stories—a relatively neglected part of your canon. What ...

I Would Try to Make Lists
Abstract: I would try to make lists,” says Del near the end of Lives of Girls and Women, and she lists ...

I. V. Crawford’s Prose Fiction
Abstract: CRAWFORD’S LITERARY RÉPUTATION will be based, as she expected it would, upon her poetry and especially upon her verse narratives. ...

If the Dress Fits
Abstract: T h e pages of The Literary Garland (1838-1859), one of Canada’s early literary periodicals, echoed with romance, sentiment, melo- ...

If You Say So
Abstract: In a house I do not own In a country of isolation In a land that belongs to others I ...

Illusion and an Atonement
Abstract: MloRTHROP FRYE, Desmond Pacey, and John Sutherland, three important Canadian critics, suggest in their comments on E. J. Pratt that ...

Image and Mood
Abstract: ΤIHREE REGENT COLLECTIONS attest to the current creative IHR: efflorescence of Michael Bullock, who has been called “one of the ...

Imagining a North American Garden
Abstract: In the beginning (he said) God created me and you and put us in a second Eng- lish garden Victoria ...

Imperial Commerce and the Canadian Muse: The Hudson’s Bay Company’s Poetic Advertising Campaign of 1966-1972
Abstract:

This essay explores the relationship between commercial publicity and poetic production in a series of advertisements devised by the head of publicity for The Hudson’s Bay Company, Mrs. Barbara Kilvert, between 1966 and 1972. Featured poets included Al Purdy, John Newlove, Alden Nowlan, Phyllis Gotlieb, A.J.M. Smith, Miriam Waddington, Joan Finnegan, James Reaney, Louis Dudek, Gwendolyn MacEwen, DG Jones, Raymond Souster, Ralph Gustafson, Gustave Lamarche, Fernand Ouellette and Jean-Guy Pilon. The advertisements were to appear in such respected periodicals as Quarry, The Tamarack Review, Queen’s Quarterly, Canadian Literature, The Malahat Review, Cité Libre, and Liberté. We examine how this campaign fitted into the history of HBC’s cultivation of its company image, and particularly its desire to identify itself with the nation it served. Did the initiative extend those accustomed patterns, or did it represent a radical new departure? And—equally important—how might such a use of poetry for promotional purposes mediate readers’ responses to the poems thus used?