Articles



Jack Hodgins’ “The Invention of the World” & Robert Browning’s “Abt Vogler”
Abstract: IiN HIS REVIEW-ARTICLE OF The Invention of the World J. R. (Tim) Struthers comments briefly on the relationship between “Abt ...

Jan Zwicky
Abstract: The publication in 1986 of Wittgenstein Elegies coincided with that of several books of poetry taking impetus from Ludwig Wittgenstein’s ...

Jane Rule & Rick Bébout, Private Letters/Public Lives: A Queer Love Story
Abstract: Jane Rule and Rick Bébout wrote each other from 1981until Rule died in November 2007. Begun as a professional correspondence, the letters quickly became personal. This essay considers letters written between 1981 and 1995 and argues that they represent a hybrid genre: private letters between public people written for multiple audiences, they are a form of life-writing. The letters provide an archive that complicates narratives of gay and lesbian identities and communities in the last decades of the twentieth-century. A rhetoric of political debate and opposition to mainstream culture is offset by a rhetoric of confession and exploration. The letters contest reductive narratives of gay and lesbian life and work and restore ambiguities, contradictions and the unexpected to our understanding of gay and lesbian history. The form as well as the content of these letters provide a way to rethink identity, community, the public and the private, and queer historiography.

Jane Rule’s Sexual Politics
Abstract: . .. truly, it felt like Year One, when all that was holy was in the process of being profaned ...

Japanese Elements in the Poetry of Fred Wah and Roy Kiyooka
Abstract: For nearly a century, Japanese poetic forms have provided inspiration for poets writing in English. The importance of Japanese poetry ...

Java to Geneva
Abstract: THE EVOLUTION OF EXPRESSION is just one of the meanings underlying the highly suggestive phrase “from Java to Geneva” in ...

Jean Le Moyne’s Itinéraire mécanologique: Machine Poetics, Reverie, and Technological Humanism
Abstract: This article examines Jean Le Moyne’s ‘mechanological’ writings during the 1960s in order to analyze the encounter between the scientific and technical discourses and cultural institutions in Canada. Best known for his collection of essays, Convergences (1961), Le Moyne engaged in a series of projects in later years that sought to overcome the divide between humanistic and scientific forms of knowledge and expression. Central to this work was Le Moyne’s attempts to adapt the form of the reverie, as developed in the work of Gaston Bachelard, as a mode of writing and genre capable of providing an account of technology in which humans and machines stood on equal footing. This article situates Le Moyne’s writings on science and technology in the context of his career in Canadian letters and politics before turning to a description and analysis of the Itinéraire mécanologique he started to write in the 1960s. In the conclusion, we consider some of the generic and institutional reasons that Le Moyne’s proposals for the integration of science and technology have been written out of accounts of his career as well as histories of Canadian literature and culture.

Jeannette Armstrong & The Colonial Legacy
Abstract: ΤIHE VOICES OF THE UNHEARD cannot help but be of value,” states Lee Maracle onI HthEe first page oí I ...

John Galt and the Canadian Star of Destiny
Abstract: ‘oHN GALT CAME то CANADA IN 1825 seething with ideas for practical improvements in canals, mills, and roads, and also ...

John Glassco (1909-1981) and his Erotic Muse
Abstract: IΌΗΝ GLASSCO CULTIVATED THE LYRIC and erotic muses — Euterpe and Erato. He was, above all, in his later years, ...