Articles



R. A. D. Ford: Poet and Diplomat
Abstract: R ARTHUR DOUGLAS FORD has lived two lives, one as a poet and oneas a diplomat. Twenty-one years of this ...

Racing the Midnight Train
Abstract: one point in Leonard Cohen’s 1963 novel The Favourite Game,the protagonist, Lawrence Breavman, is contemplating the possibility of a timeless ...

Raven Travelling: Page One
Abstract: Transcribed at Skidegate in October 1900 by John Swanton Edited & Translatedby Robert Bringhurst Introduction Haida is one of the ...

Re-considering Margaret Horsfield’s Cougar Annie’s Garden
Abstract: It is within the context of living in Hesquiaht traditional territories, of being a part of the House of Kinquashtacumlth ...

Re-Introducing Canadian “Art of the Theatre”
Abstract: I, I N T R O D U C T I O N S A RE I M P O ...

Re-reading Grove
Abstract: The handmill gives you society with the feudal lord; the steam mill, society with the industrial capitalist. KARL MARX, The ...

Reading Carrier’s “The Nun Who Returned to Ireland”
Abstract: RLOCH CARRIER’S “The Nun Who Returned to Ireland” (“La Religieuse qui retourna en Irlande”) concerns a young French boy learning ...

Reading Closely: Discursive Frames and Technological Mediations in Carol Shields’ Unless
Abstract: Carol Shields's Unless centres upon a moment of racialized and gendered violence that is paradoxically absent from the novel. This pivotal scene of violence, tenuously offered as an explanation for what has happened to the narrator Reta's teenaged daughter, Norah, appears only as a self-consciously mediated and discursively framed event: characters read about it in newspapers or witness it on serendipitously acquired security footage, but the only character who could speak of it directly remains silent. This paper offers a reading of Unless as a novel about the unrepresentability of violence itself. Drawing on Judith Butler’s recent work on the power of discursive frames to shape the recognizability and grievability of the lives of others, I argue that the novel denies readers access to “the truth” of what happened to Norah, instead providing a literary space that reproduces the ethical imperative to relate to the other without indulging in fantasies of comprehension.

Reading Frames of Reference
Abstract: Whydoesitdisturbusthatthemapbeincludedinthemapandthethousand andone nights in the book of the Thousand and One Nights? Why does it disturb us that Don Quixote ...

Reading Mark Hume and the River
Abstract: As for men, those myriad little detached ponds with their own swimming corpuscular life, what were they but a way ...