Articles



U.S./Canadian Writers’ Perspectives On The Multiculturalism Debate
Abstract: Panel Contributions by Clark Blaise, Nicole Brossard, George Elliott Clarke, Paul Yee; Response by Geeta PatelGraham HugganIn 1993, a special ...

Un demi-siècle de réception critique de la littérature québécoise au Canada anglais
Abstract: Cet article propose un bilan de nos recherches sur le sujet et en énonce les résultats partiels, compte tenu du ...

Un recueil de récits brefs
Abstract: GIABRiELLE ROYFIGURE au premier rang des écrivains qué- bécois ayant abordé le genre encore mal défini du recueil de récits ...

Unbecoming a dirty savage
Abstract: Jane Willis’s autobiography, Geniesh: An Indian Girlhood, deals with the author’s experiences growing up in the 1950s as a student ...

Unbinding Isaac and God
Abstract: In a poem titled “Their Lonely Betters,” W.H. Auden observes that language entails culpability. Unlike birds and flowers, humans have ...

Uncertain Landscapes: Risk, Trauma, and Scientific Knowledge in Madeleine Thien’s Certainty and Dogs at the Perimeter
Abstract: This paper explores Madeleine Thien's engagement with scientific knowledge as a tool for negotiating risk and trauma in her novels Certainty and Dogs at the Perimeter. I argue that, despite her emphasis on the failure of any one scientific discipline to quell the uncertainties experienced by Asian Canadian diasporas, Thien stresses that such unknowns need to be confronted through multiple avenues, as opposed to a single field of inquiry. I thus argue that, more than simply offering a critique of science, Thien’s novels prompt us to consider how diasporic communities might productively engage with the sciences in order to construct the ecologies of knowledge that are necessary for grappling with the complex histories of trauma that continue to shape their experiences. In this sense, these texts make an important contribution to ongoing efforts to rethink the cultural critique of science in order to produce epistemologies that might “deal simultaneously with the sciences, with natures, and with politics, in the plural” (Latour 3).

Under Coyote’s Eye
Abstract: B’ACK IN 1975 H. R. Ellis Davidson delivered a paper to the Annual General Meeting of the Folklore Society entitled ...

Under the Volcano
Abstract: IN CHAPTER SEVEN OF Under the Volcano, Laruelle chal- lenges the basic validity of the Consul’s quest. The Consul first ...

Underground or Alternative
Abstract: ΤHOSE “hippie rags”, known commonly as underground papers, were never ve1ryнfеar under Canadian ground. To earn the name “under- ground”, ...

Underground, Unseen, Unknown: Negotiating Toronto in Maggie Helwig’s Girls Fall Down
Abstract: Girls Fall Down proposes that an awareness of how to one’s position in relation to the situation of others and other things—that is, the very ability to clearly map one’s place in relation to other, shifting people and things—also demands a self-understanding that a control over one’s environment (including how one presents oneself in it) is merely a fantasy. A person’s inability to always map out with certainty the city as it is encountered suggests, in Helwig’s book, a crisis of legibility that is inherent in the urban landscapes themselves. Helwig’s various networks—from assorted means of transportation to interpersonal human relationships—are fragile and fraught, to the extent that what we easily label as “the city,” despite its seemingly solid material forms (both alive and inert), is best understood as provisional: the confluence and convergence of its actors underscore both a place and a landscape that is constantly re-envisioned and is always makeshift.