Articles



Writers and the Mass Media
Abstract: ΤIHE PURPOSE of this paper is not to discuss the many points at which the writer comes into contact with ...

Writers Without Borders: The Global Framework of Canada’s Early Literary History
Abstract: Writers Without Borders: The Global Framework of Canada’s Early Literary History1 Carole Gerson In “Publishing Abroad,” a significant contribution to ...

Writing Jacob Two-Two
Abstract: W RITING ABOUT WRITING is something I find excrutiating, embarrassing, even dangerous, and so I usually beg off such an ...

Writing a Home for Prairie Blackness
Abstract: In the late s, the deteriorating log cabin of Alberta’s best-known black pioneer, the cowboy John Ware, was relocated from ...

Writing Dislocation: Transculturalism, Gender, Immigrant Families A Conversation with Ven Begamudré
Abstract: Ven Begamudré has published a novella, Sacrifices (The Porcupine’s Quill, 1986); a short story collection, A Planet ofEccentrics (Oolichan, 1990); ...

Writing of the Decade
Abstract: W H E N Canadian Literature began in 1959, Canada was happily ex- periencing a traumatic publishing season. All at ...

Writing of the Decade
Abstract: AROUND 1955 there arose among Canadian writers a creative quest for new approaches to literary expression. A gradual but firm ...

Writing of the Decade
Abstract: THE FACT THAT Canadian Literature has flourished during the last ten years suggests that criticism in Canada has also flourished. ...

Writing Paintings and Thinking Physics: Anne Simpson’s Poetry
Abstract: Born in Toronto, raised in Burlington, Anne Simpson has lived in Nova Scotia for 15 years. Her first collection of ...

Writing Quebec City in Andrée Maillet’s Les Remparts de Québec and Nalini Warriar’s The Enemy Within
Abstract: Part of a larger project on literary representations of Québec’s secondary cities and exurban spaces, this article looks at mappings of Quebec City in Andrée Maillet’s Les Remparts de Québec (1965) and Nalini Warriar’s The Enemy Within (2005). Quebec City’s status as ‘founding city’ is a significant part of its importance within the francophone imaginary. It is key, too, to its touristic appeal, with traces of its architectural heritage attracting large crowds every year. As a provincial capital, the city might be expected to be somewhat conservative. This assumption is challenged, however, in cultural practices such as Robert Lepage’s high-tech performance company, Ex Machina, and strong graffiti and bande-dessinée cultures. Critics often highlight the dual nature of Quebec City. This piece explores the plays around appearance and reality in the selected novels to consider the ways in which these engage with questions around ethnic diversity and Québécois identity.