Articles



Canadian Poets and the Great Tradition
Abstract: I. IN T H E BEGINNING, as Francis Bacon observes, “God Al- mightie first Planted a Garden … the Greatest ...

Canadian Postwar Book Diplomacy and Settler Contradiction
Abstract: Rehearsed most recently in Nick Mount’s Arrival: The Story of CanLit, the popular narrative in the cultural and literary history ...

Canadian Publishing: Answers to a Questionnaire
Abstract: 1. What is worst in Canadian publishing? Editorial standards. Editorial initiative. Dim-witted old ladies in backrooms instead of bright young ...

Canadiana Accumulates: An Editorial Michelin
Abstract: Centennial Year and the months that have followed its end have de- posited a vast jetsam of books on the ...

Cape Breton is the Thought Control Center of Canada
Abstract: OF THESE THREE BOOKS, Man In The Glass Octopus is worth reading and was therefore worth pub¬lishing. It is a ...

Careers and Explorations: A Conversation with Phyllis Webb
Abstract: An interview with Phyllis Webb in which she reflects on her career as a writer and painter.

Carnivalesque and Parody in “Le Jardin des délices”
Abstract: IN THEIR TREATMENT OF THE NOVELS of Roch Carrier, critics have discussed the presence in them of mordant satire that ...

Carol Coates Cassidy and the Form Dispute
Abstract: MΙΟ-ONE WHO NOW READS the early issues of the Canadian Poetry Magazine can be insensible to the apparent 1930’s proliferation ...

Caroline Clement: The Hidden Life of Mazo de la Roche’s Collaborator
Abstract: “In privacy I can find myself and the creative impulse in me can move unhampered,” said Mazo de la Roche ...

Cartographic Dissonance: Between Geographies in Douglas Glover’s Elle
Abstract:

This paper juxtaposes the multiple sixteenth-century geographies of Douglas Glover’s Elle, introducing a theory of cartographic dissonance to refer to the ability to hold two or more “competing” conceptualizations of a single geographic space in mind. As I will demonstrate, the evolving trajectory of this novel moves readers to regret the imperial project as it was carried out in these lands. And as contact emerges from Elle’s narrative as a missed opportunity to cooperatively create a truly “new” world, the novel simultaneously draws our attention to some of the specific ways in which Canadians continue to perpetuate this failure.