Articles



“Helena’s Household”: James De Mille’s Heretical Text
Abstract: С(RiTiCAL STUDIES OF JAMES DE MILLE have tended to centre almost exclusively on Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder ...

“How the World Burns”: Adults Writing War for Children
Abstract: Writing about war for children? The challenges and responsibilities of such a project raise questions that resist easy answers. First ...

“I diverge / you diverge / we diverge”
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“I had never seen such a shed called a house before”: The Discourse of Home in Susanna Moodie’s Roughing It in the Bush
Abstract: “I had never seen such a shed called a house before”: The Discourse of Home in Susanna Moodie’s Roughing It ...

“I write this for all of you”: Recovering the Unpublished RCMP “Incident” in Maria Campbell’s Halfbreed (1973)
Abstract: In a 1989 interview, Métis author Maria Campbell complained to Hartmut Lutz that a section of her autobiography, Halfbreed, first published in 1973, was removed by the publisher against her wishes. During a chance meeting with Campbell in Dublin in 2017, and following Indigenous protocols, Deanna Reder and Alix Shield asked her for permission to search for early versions of Campbell's text. With Campbell's blessing, Alix Shield conducted an archival search for any early material, and discovered the excised passage that revealed that when Campbell was a teenager, she had been raped by RCMP officers. This article includes the found text and discusses the impact of its excision.

“I’ll Be My Own Master”: Domestic Conflicts and Discursive Resistance in Maurermeister Ihles Haus and Our Daily Bread
Abstract: “BASICALLY, Master Mason Ihle despised everything that was female” (99), is the phrase F. P. Grove used to describe the ...

“In The Fifth City”: An Integral chapter of “The New Ancestors”
Abstract: D.VE GODFREY’S NOVEL The New Ancestors1 contains one A very puzzling chapter entitled “In the Fifth City.” The book’s other ...

“Is Richler Canadian Content?”: Jewishness, Race, and Diaspora
Abstract: In 2004, two questions were asked in reference to Mordecai Richler, questions that position Jewish and Canadian in opposition. The questions—“Is Richler Canadian Content?” and “Whose history is being told? Jewish or Canadian?”—seem to belong to an image of the past found in The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz. And yet these questions not only were asked recently, but failed to draw attention to their ideological assumptions. One was posed as the topic of a plenary panel for “The Richler Challenge” conference, held at the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada, March 18-19, 2004. And the other was asked by Coral Ann Howells and Peter Noble in the introduction to Where are the Voices Coming From? Canadian Culture and the Legacies of History (2004). This paper takes up these questions and their underlying logic.

“It should never have occurred”: Documentary Appropriation, Resistant Reading, and the Ethical Ambivalence of McAlmon’s Chinese Opera
Abstract: This essay explores the ethical dimensions of documentary appropriation by staging a "resistant reading" of Stephen Scobie's McAlmon's Chinese Opera(1980). By dwelling on Robert McAlmon's documented aversion to seeing his controversial marriage transformed into literature, Scobie's long poem effectively commits the very transgression it thematizes while also encouraging the reader to further scrutinize McAlmon's private life. Yet Opera'sproliferation of transgressions is inextricably linked to its efforts to rescue McAlmon from historical obscurity, and to pay homage to the values inherent in his own writings. With this in mind, Operaserves as a compelling example of the ethical ambivalence often at play in the documentary long poem's engagement with historical figures and events.

“It’s no different than anywhere else” Regionalism, Place, and Popular Culture in Lynn Coady’s Saints of Big Harbour
Abstract: This paper argues that Lynn Coady’s Saints of Big Harbour (2002) resists the static and stereotypical portrayal of place and identity often associated with Atlantic-Canadian culture and literature by portraying the participation of the adolescent characters (in early 1980s Cape Breton) in a transnational popular culture rather than an "authentic" local folk culture, by emphasizing the banal sameness rather than the unique particularities of Cape Breton, by downplaying the impact of geography on identity formation, and by critiquing the parochial and localist understandings of place associated with some of the adult characters. In doing so, Saints articulates an understanding of place as unfixed and porous rather than as static and bounded, and thus provides a portrait of Cape Breton as part of not apart from the contemporary world.