Articles



“It should never have occurred”: Documentary Appropriation, Resistant Reading, and the Ethical Ambivalence of McAlmon’s Chinese Opera
Abstract: This essay explores the ethical dimensions of documentary appropriation by staging a "resistant reading" of Stephen Scobie's McAlmon's Chinese Opera(1980). By dwelling on Robert McAlmon's documented aversion to seeing his controversial marriage transformed into literature, Scobie's long poem effectively commits the very transgression it thematizes while also encouraging the reader to further scrutinize McAlmon's private life. Yet Opera'sproliferation of transgressions is inextricably linked to its efforts to rescue McAlmon from historical obscurity, and to pay homage to the values inherent in his own writings. With this in mind, Operaserves as a compelling example of the ethical ambivalence often at play in the documentary long poem's engagement with historical figures and events.

“It was always what was under the poetry that mattered”: Reading the Paratext in Once in Blockadia by Stephen Collis
Abstract: Narratologist Gérard Genette describes paratext as any elements of a book located around or between the main text of poetry ...

“It’s no different than anywhere else” Regionalism, Place, and Popular Culture in Lynn Coady’s Saints of Big Harbour
Abstract: This paper argues that Lynn Coady’s Saints of Big Harbour (2002) resists the static and stereotypical portrayal of place and identity often associated with Atlantic-Canadian culture and literature by portraying the participation of the adolescent characters (in early 1980s Cape Breton) in a transnational popular culture rather than an "authentic" local folk culture, by emphasizing the banal sameness rather than the unique particularities of Cape Breton, by downplaying the impact of geography on identity formation, and by critiquing the parochial and localist understandings of place associated with some of the adult characters. In doing so, Saints articulates an understanding of place as unfixed and porous rather than as static and bounded, and thus provides a portrait of Cape Breton as part of not apart from the contemporary world.

“Klee Wyck”: Redefining Region through Marginal Realities
Abstract: Ε»MiLY CARR’S FIRST BOOK, earned the Governor-General’s award for best non-fiction in Canada in 1942. But it has, since then, ...

“La Leçon de la vie de bois”: Wilderness & Civilization in Constantin-Weyer’s “La Bourrasque”
Abstract: A,N IMPRESSIONABLE YOUNG man eager for adventure left France to visit North America at the beginning of this century. His ...

“Look! Listen! Mark My Words!”
Abstract: “It’s all an attempt not to say what you don’t want to say. You’ve achieved art when you cannot be ...

“Meat Like You Like It”: The Production of Identity in Atwood’s “Cat’s Eye”
Abstract: You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, you put a mirror in her hand and you ...

“Middlewatch” as Magic Realism
Abstract: IREAD SUSAN KERSLAKE’S first novel, Middlewatch^ in the spring of 1977. I found it a book not without minor flaws. ...

“Now That I Am Dead”: P. K. Page and the Self-Elegy
Abstract: Over the years, P.K. Page’s poetry has reflected the varied experiences of her life. Not surprisingly, since entering old age, ...

“Other Times, Other Places”: Narrative Displacement in Ray Smith’s Writing
Abstract: R.S.] “Scratch a Nova Scotian and within three sentences you’re back to The Clearances; one more sentence and you’re back ...