Articles



“It’s no different than anywhere else” Regionalism, Place, and Popular Culture in Lynn Coady’s Saints of Big Harbour
Abstract: This paper argues that Lynn Coady’s Saints of Big Harbour (2002) resists the static and stereotypical portrayal of place and identity often associated with Atlantic-Canadian culture and literature by portraying the participation of the adolescent characters (in early 1980s Cape Breton) in a transnational popular culture rather than an "authentic" local folk culture, by emphasizing the banal sameness rather than the unique particularities of Cape Breton, by downplaying the impact of geography on identity formation, and by critiquing the parochial and localist understandings of place associated with some of the adult characters. In doing so, Saints articulates an understanding of place as unfixed and porous rather than as static and bounded, and thus provides a portrait of Cape Breton as part of not apart from the contemporary world.

“Klee Wyck”: Redefining Region through Marginal Realities
Abstract: Ε»MiLY CARR’S FIRST BOOK, earned the Governor-General’s award for best non-fiction in Canada in 1942. But it has, since then, ...

“La Leçon de la vie de bois”: Wilderness & Civilization in Constantin-Weyer’s “La Bourrasque”
Abstract: A,N IMPRESSIONABLE YOUNG man eager for adventure left France to visit North America at the beginning of this century. His ...

“Look! Listen! Mark My Words!”
Abstract: “It’s all an attempt not to say what you don’t want to say. You’ve achieved art when you cannot be ...

“Meat Like You Like It”: The Production of Identity in Atwood’s “Cat’s Eye”
Abstract: You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, you put a mirror in her hand and you ...

“Middlewatch” as Magic Realism
Abstract: IREAD SUSAN KERSLAKE’S first novel, Middlewatch^ in the spring of 1977. I found it a book not without minor flaws. ...

“Now That I Am Dead”: P. K. Page and the Self-Elegy
Abstract: Over the years, P.K. Page’s poetry has reflected the varied experiences of her life. Not surprisingly, since entering old age, ...

“Other Times, Other Places”: Narrative Displacement in Ray Smith’s Writing
Abstract: R.S.] “Scratch a Nova Scotian and within three sentences you’re back to The Clearances; one more sentence and you’re back ...

“Our symbiotic relationship with the stories that we tell”: An Interview with Michael Crummey
Abstract: This is an interview with Michael Crummey which took place in 2011 following the publication of his award-winning novel Galore. Michael Crummey is one of the foremost writers of contemporary Newfoundland. His poetry and fiction is renowned for its focus on the stories and traditions of Newfoundland culture. A central theme of his work is the mixed form of indebtedness people in the present owe to the past as inheritors of its traditions, prejudices, violence, and stories. As Crummey elucidates in this interview, these myriad forms of cultural memory combine in intangible ways to constitute the living world of contemporary Newfoundlanders. In this interview, Crummey discusses how these questions informGalore and many of his other writings, particularly the ways conceptions of the carry-oneffect of inheritance and emplacement are integral to a Newfoundland sense of cultural-historical identity.

“pain, pleasure, shame. Shame.”: Masculine Embodiment, Kinship, and Indigenous Reterritorialization
Abstract: This paper argues that the gender segregation, the derogation of the feminine, and the shaming of the body that occurred systematically within residential schools were not merely by-products of Euro-Christian patriarchy, but rather served—and serve—the goal of colonial dispossession by troubling lived experiences of ecosystemic territoriality and effacing kinship relations that constitute modes of Indigenous governance. This paper thus asks: If the coordinated assaults on Indigenous embodiment and on Indigenous cosmologies of gender are not just two among several interchangeable tools of colonial dispossession but are in fact integral to the Canadian colonial project, can embodied actions that self-consciously reintegrate gender complementarity be mobilized to foment not simply ‘healing’ but the radical reterritorialization and sovereignty that will make meaningful ‘reconciliation’ possible? I pursue this question through the study of autobiographical and fictional writings by residential school survivors as well as testimony from the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission.