Articles



Climate of Unrest: Periodicals in the Twenties and Thirties
Abstract: ΤHE SPIRIT OF PATRIOTISM which arose in Canada during the “boom” era of the earlier 1900’s and culminated in the ...

Climbing Mount Everest: Postcolonialism in Culture of Ascent
Abstract: It scarcely needs saying that “Mount Everest” is not just “there.”1 As just about every book on Himalayas mountaineering likes ...

Closed Circle
Abstract: ONE OF THE MOST impressive qualities of The Double Hook is the fineness of the correlation between content, form, and ...

Collaborative Auto/biography and Aboriginal Enfranchisement in Occupied Canada
Abstract: In a prose poem included in Métis writer Marilyn Dumont’s 1996 volume A Really Good Brown Girl, the speaker, faced ...

Colloquial Style and the Tory Mode
Abstract: The modern mind insists on having the process of standardization (in ‘prestige forms’ of speech) take the form of a ...

Colonial Contracts: Marriage, Rape, and Consent in Malcolm’s Katie
Abstract: This paper considers the implications of the final lines of Isabella Valancy Crawford’s 1884 long poem Malcolm’s Katie: A Love story, in which the newlywed settler wife proclaims that she would not exchange the bounty of a settler wife’s life for Eden itself if I knew my mind, arguing that the poem’s feminist urgency lies in its self-conscious depiction of Katie’s absent mindedness (BentleyIntroduction) and Crawford’s suggestive portrayal of the consequences of Katie’s lack of consciousness for the regulation of her body, its affects, and its reproductive potential within colonial society. Drawing from studies of later-nineteenth-century law around marriage, rape and property, this paper investigates the poem’s representation of feminine desire and consent as central to an understanding women as vehicles of both territorial claim and inheritance through which the acquisition of colonial land is justified, naturalized, and perpetuated on behalf of the developing nation.

Colonial Cosmopolitanism? Resistance, Aesthetics, and Modernism in Patrick Anderson’s Prose
Abstract: In this article, I contend with the claim that Patrick Anderson exemplifies the failure of Canadian modernist cosmopolitanism. I explore the potential value and limitation of Anderson’s works as what I have termed “colonial cosmopolitanism”. I view colonial cosmopolitanism as a form of cosmopolitan thought that brings its inherent contradiction to the fore. Anderson’s travel writing, with its inward gaze, self-critical narration, and engagement with difference, suggest that one of the central contributions Anderson makes in this period is defining Canadian cosmopolitanism in the genre of travel writing. Anderson’s work offers a more nuanced way of thinking about cosmopolitanism in a colonial context. In this article, I demonstrate some of the ways that Anderson’s modernist cosmopolitanism can at least partially succeed, all while continuing to acknowledge and tease out the “exemplary failure” of colonial cosmopolitanism to extricate itself from colonial ideology.

Colonialist Discourse, Lord Featherstone’s Yawn and the Significance of the Denouement in A Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder
Abstract: The notoriously brusque conclusion to James De Mille’s A Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder is, in most instances, ...

Coming Home through Grandmother Rosa’s Story: Basil Johnston’s Crazy Dave
Abstract: This essay focuses on Basil Johnston’s Crazy Dave, a narrative which tells of Johnston’s disconnection from his Anishinaubae culture and his relationship with his paternal grandmother Rosa McLeod and with his uncle David McLeod. My essay examines the ways in which Grandmother Rosa initiates the process of mental decolonization by transmitting cultural knowledge to Johnston who in turn uses this knowledge to rebuild his identity, reconceptualize his understanding of place, and return home. Employing William Bevis’ “homing in” model, Anthony Paul Kerby’s identity formation analysis, Joseph E. Couture’s examination of the role of Elders, and Neal McLeod’s “coming home [as] hermeneutical act” model, the paper demonstrates how, by narrating Grandmother Rosa’s life story, Johnston successfully journeys from ignorance to knowledge, appreciating how his dislocation and alienation originated in the past, and how his removal to residential school many years before was part of a larger history of colonization.

Coming Home to the World
Abstract: THE TYPICAL SETTING for a poem by D. G. Jones, in 1953 or 1973, is some ruraАl НpЕlace in the ...