Articles



Drama on the Air
Abstract:   DRAMA  ON THE AIR  George Robertson  ΤHE FIRST TIME I saw a script for a radio play, it seemed  ...

Drawn Out: Identity Politics and the Queer Comics of Leanne Franson and Ariel Schrag
Abstract: In the heteronormative world of comics the existence of queer autobiographical and semi-autobiographical comics such as those by Leanne Franson and Ariel Schrag constitute acts of resistance.  Both artists explore issues of sexual identity and self-representation.  Both artists are also interested in the divisive nature of sexual identity politics in relation to issues such as homophobia and internalized homophobia.  Because they are richly visual texts comics provide an ideal medium to reveal the possibilities of changing looks and performing identities and the role of these performances in creating or maintaining community.  Schrag focuses on the exhaustive adolescent roller coaster of making meaning and forging identity from experience in high school, while Franson, through her more mature character, invites us to see the potential for seeing difference as spectrum rather than hierarchy.  Both Schrag and Franson, by writing and drawing their own lesbian or bisexual bodies, challenge both the dominant heteronormativity and the norms within their own subcultures.

Du Singulier à l’Universel
Abstract: LrONGTEMPs IGNORÉE, l’oeuvre du conteur Albert Laberge fut tirée d’un oubli immérité grâce à l’intérêt que lui portèrent quelques critiques ...

Dudek on Frye
Abstract: PERHAPS NOTHING WRITTEN during the three decades that Northrop Frye reigned as Canada’s most eminent literary figure expresses the spirit ...

Dumplings and Dignity
Abstract: IN CONVERSATION WITH DONALD CAMERON, W. O. Mitchell stated: “To me the only justification for art is that this particular ...

Duncan Campbell Scott
Abstract: This essay is the substance of a lecture delivered by Dr. Smith in 1958 at Carleton University under the auspices ...

Duncan’s Passage to India
Abstract: IΝ THE COURSE of the world tour recorded in A Social Departure, Sara Jeannette Duncan and her travelling companion, Lily ...

Duncan’s Web
Abstract: WHILE THE OVERT subject of The Imperialist is indeed imperialism, the novel’s deeper structural unity derives from its focus on ...

Duncan’s Folly: The Murchison House as Mock Ruin
Abstract: Sara Jeannette Duncan’s The Imperialist (1904) is an important text for discussing Canada’s shifting cultural, colonial, and political status during a period of notable transition. Signs of this transition come through in Duncan’s descriptions of the Murchison house as a space of both distinction and encroaching dilapidation. In fact, her representation of the house as a site of architectural idiosyncrasy verging on ruination suggests that she may have envisioned it as a kind of folly—that is, as a purpose-built ruin of the sort that came to be a distinguishing feature of European landscape design in the eighteenth century. Although critics have long been interested in the role of the Murchison house within the novel, the notion of the house as a ruin has yet to be explored, despite Duncan’s careful attention to its picturesque qualities and its evident state of disrepair. By reading the Murchison house as an artificial ruin, this essay considers the novel’s subtle integration of British cultural tradition into a distinctly Canadian setting.