Articles



The Bingocentric Worlds of Michel Tremblay and Tomson Highway: Les Belles-Soeurs vs The Rez Sisters
Abstract: The emergent theatre of Native peoples offers theatre scholars and historians a unique opportunity to observe the fusion of cul- ...

The Bird of Heavenly Airs: Thematic Strains in Douglas Le Pan’s Poetry
Abstract: IF . s. ELIOT’s THEORY is valid — “that genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood”1 — then Douglas ...

The Blasphemies of A. M. Klein
Abstract: MIRIAM WADDINGTON argues in her study of A. M. Klein1 that it is wrong to think of him as a ...

The Body-Odour of Race
Abstract: Τ,ΗΕ PROBLEM OF RACE and ethnic relations has never been a ЖНЕ major concern of Canadian Literature. By contrast, the ...

The Bridge or the Stokehold?
Abstract: QUR SUBJECT is Canadian Literature, and you will be justified in saying, “She did not talk about Canadian Literature.” And ...

The Canadian Climate
Abstract: ‘ECAUSE I WAS BORN AND RAISED in the United States and came to Canada for the first time when I ...

The Canadian Critic: Is He Necessary?
Abstract: A.BOUT ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO, England’s leading literary critic, Matthew Arnold, declared that good criticism was more important than second-rate ...

The Canadian Goldsmith
Abstract: OLIVER GOLDSMITH, the Cana- dian Oliver Goldsmith who wrote “The Rising Village” in emulation of his great- uncle’s “The Deserted ...

The Canadian Identity and African Nationalism
Abstract: A MODEST BUT NONETHELESS NOTEWORTHY t r i b u t a r y flowing into the mainstream of recent ...

The Canadian Little Magazine Past and Present: Can Digitizing a Literary Subculture Make a Movement?
Abstract: This essay investigates the literary subculture of Canada's little magazines as a pretext to asking a timely question about media and reception:  namely, whether the cultivation of voice, readership, and literary ethos in the relatively closed, high-modern "nationalist" world of the printed little magazines of mid century is transferable to the more open, polysemous post-modern spheres of today's digitized online magazines.  It asks, in other words, if spatial conventions associated with print and digital form and distribution alter the characteristics and engagements of the author/reader that produces/receives little-magazine text, the most important of those characteristics in any subculture being the ability to use language with ideological intent.  In short, to paraphrase Ezra Pound, can on-line little magazines create a literary subculture in ways that print magazines did?