Author Spotlights

Reading, Writing, Listening: Author Spotlight – Tom Wayman

December 31, 2020

Photo by Jude Dillon

Tom Wayman’s newest poetry collection is Watching a Man Break a Dog’s Back: Poems for a Dark Time (Harbour, 2020). His essay collection, If You’re Not Free at Work, Where Are You Free: Literature and Social Change (Guernica), was a finalist for the Poetry Foundation’s 2019 Pegasus Award, selected as one of the five best books of poetry criticism published in the US in 2018. He lives in the Selkirk Mountains of southeastern B.C.

His poem “In a Bleak Time” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/in-a-bleak-time/.

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.


Reading, Writing, Listening: Author Spotlight – Emilie Sarah Caravecchia

December 24, 2020

Emilie Sarah Caravecchia, occupante de Tiohtià:ke (Montréal), est professeure de littérature française au Collège Montmorency et est coordonnatrice du programme de Littérature. Après, quelque quinze années d’enseignement, elle est retournée à l’Université de Montréal, au Département de littératures et de langues du monde, où elle a amorcé ses recherches sur les littératures autochtones produites dans le contexte francophone du Québec.

Elle a publié dans Libérer la colère (2018) et Post-Scriptum (2019). Elle a également remporté la Bourse d’excellence en Études Autochtones du Festival Métropolis Bleu pour son essai Que veut dire une société juste? (2020).

Article

“Se redéfinir dans la langue colonisatrice. Nouvelles voix autochtones francophones : Chroniques de Kitchike de Picar-Sioui et Bréviaire du matricule 082 de Cousineau-Mollen

Abstract

L’écriture littéraire dans la langue colonisatrice est un choix conscient pour l’auteur.trice autochtone. Dans Chroniques de Kitchike de Louis-Karl Picard-Sioui (Wendat) et de Bréviaire du matricule 082 de Maya Cousineau-Mollen (Innu), ces deux nouvelles voix littéraires illustrent la dépossession identitaire des leur. Chez P.-Sioui, la réappropriation passe par l’humour et les jeux sémantiques. Dans ses nouvelles, il illustre les travestissements identitaires en jouant sur les vocables et en soulignant le caractère fictif de la connaissance des langues ancestrales. Pour C.-Mollen, la réappropriation de la narration identitaire s’exprime plutôt par le sarcasme et la colère. Si, la poétesse joue sur la langue coloniale législative ayant réduit l’identité « indienne » à des chiffres, elle y répond par la résurgence de l’Innu-aïmun. Cela dit, sa réappropriation est également celle de sa condition de femme autochtone revendiquant sa sexualité libérée des fictions coloniales de la princesse ou de la « squaw ».

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store at https://canlit.ca/support/purchase/single-issues/.


Reading, Writing, Listening : Author Spotlight – Jade Wallace

December 17, 2020

Jade Wallace’s poetry and fiction have appeared or are forthcoming internationally, including in Grain Magazine, PRISM International, and The South Carolina Review. They are an organizing member of Draft Reading Series, the reviews editor for CAROUSEL, and one half of the collaborative writing entity MA|DE, whose sophomore collaborative chapbook, ZZOO, is forthcoming with Collusion Books in October 2020. <jadewallace.ca>

Their poem “Grip” can be read on our website at bit.ly/241WallaceP.

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.


Reading, Writing, Listening : Author Spotlight – Sam Weselowski

December 10, 2020

Sam Weselowski is a PhD Candidate in English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick, working at the intersections of scale, poetics, and environmental humanities. His critical writing has appeared in Litterae Mentis: A Journal of Literary Studies. His poetry has appeared in Hotel and Canadian Literature. His chapbook I LOVE MY JOB was published by If a Leaf Falls Press in 2019.

Article

“Jeff Derksen’s Citational Poetics”

Abstract

This paper investigates Jeff Derksen’s citational poetics in The Vestiges, and how this text’s creative practice critically examines the processes of neoliberalization in the present. With citational poetics, I see Derksen’s writing copy and comment on multiple textual forms in order to depict the poem’s role in social observation alongside its ability mobilize and array these textual forms against structures that far exceed the structure of the poem itself. The Vestiges in turn displays how the disparate materials of the long neoliberal moment and the traces of its manifold processes — from critical theory and chart topping hits to overthrown governments — can be brought to bear on the present, and specifically how mobilizing these different kinds of textual and historical matter locate citational poetics within a wider project of anti-capitalist research.

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.


Reading, Writing, Listening : Author Spotlight – Frank Klaassen

December 3, 2020

Frank Klaassen teaches History at the University of Saskatchewan. His poetry has appeared in various literary journals including Stand, Oxford Poetry, The Malahat Review, The New Quarterly, and The Dalhousie Review. His other publications include The Transformations of Magic and Making Magic in Elizabethan England.

His poem “The business of the grass” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/the-business-of-the-grass/.

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.


Reading, Writing, Listening: Author Spotlight – Helena van Praet

November 26, 2020

Helena Van Praet is a PhD candidate and assistant in Dutch Literature at Université Catholique de Louvain. She studied English and Dutch Literature and Linguistics at Vrije Universiteit Brussel and University College London (UCL), and is the 2018 laureate of the BAAHE Thesis Award for her MA dissertation on Canadian author Anne Carson. Her research focuses on contemporary experimental poetry.

Article

“Writer’s Writer Revisits Authorship: Iteration in Anne Carson’s Decreation

Abstract

This essay explores how Anne Carson’s Decreation: Poetry, Essays, Opera (2005) engages with the notion of authorship by reappropriating critical voices and rewriting central ideas. It accordingly takes Carson’s alleged name-dropping as a starting point to argue that Decreation is a project of re-engagement that is underpinned by synthetic disjunctions of competing viewpoints. To this end, Carson relies on the principle of intratextuality, which instils a blurring of the speaker’s identity in the reader, while her use of echoes ingrains the notion of decreation in the reader’s mind. Since both aesthetic strategies hinge on the principles of creative reproduction and recognition, they are capable of evoking a sense of iteration. In this way, Carson’s collection instigates a critical re-evaluation of the notion of agency in literary production while still providing the reader with an—albeit paradoxical—centre of conceptual gravity, which is therefore better conceptualized as a network of relations.

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.


Verse Forward: Poetry on the Frontlines: Author Spotlight—Jillian Christmas

November 24, 2020

Jillian Christmas is a queer, afro-Caribbean writer living on the unceded territories of the Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, and Musqueam people (Vancouver, BC). She has won numerous poetry titles, notably breaking ground as the first Canadian to perform on the final stage of the Women of the World Poetry Slam. Jillian has presented poetry and theory in a multitude of venues. She is the author of The Gospel of Breaking (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2020).

Come hear Jillian Christmas speak on November 25, 2020 at 7:00p.m. (PST) at the inaugural event of Canadian Literature’s new reading series, “Verse Forward: Poetry on the Front Line.” Register here bit.ly/VerseFwd!


Reading, Writing, Listening: Author Spotlight – Laura Moss

November 19, 2020

Laura Moss is Professor of English at UBC where she primarily teaches Canadian and African literatures. Laura served as Associate Editor (Reviews) of Canadian Literature from 2004-2015 and as Acting Editor in 2008 and 2013-14. From 2015 to 2020, she served as Editor-in-Chief of the journal and as co-editor of The CanLit Guides project. In addition to five edited books, Moss has published articles on the work of J.M. Coetzee, M.G. Vassanji, Salman Rushdie, Zaide Smith, Margaret Atwood, Chinua Achebe, Rohinton Mistry, and Antje Krog, among others, and has written on literary pedagogy, public arts policy in Canada, multiculturalism policy, seed practices, and public memorials in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Her current research concerns environmental art and activism in Canada. And she now holds the Brenda and David McLean Chair in Canadian Studies (2019-21). Since Spring 2020, she has served as the Associate Dean of Students in the UBC Faculty of Arts.

Her editorial “111 Days of COVID and Reading” can be read on our website here.

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.


Verse Forward: Poetry on the Frontlines: Author Spotlight—Fred Wah

November 17, 2020

BC poet Fred Wah’s most recent project is Music at the Heart of Thinking: Improvisations 1-170, published by Talonbooks in 2020. Also recently, he has published a collaboration with Rita Wong about the Columbia River, beholden: a poem as long as the river (Talonbooks, 2019), and contributed to the collaboratively created interactive website High Muck a Muck: Playing Chinese, An Interactive Poem (http://highmuckamuck.ca/). He lives in Vancouver and on Kootenay Lake.

Come hear Fred Wah speak on November 25, 2020 at 7:00p.m. (PST) at the inaugural event of Canadian Literature’s new reading series, “Verse Forward: Poetry on the Front Line.” Register here bit.ly/VerseFwd!


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – Dan MacIsaac

November 12, 2020

Dan MacIsaac is a trial lawyer and a former director on UVIC’s Environmental Law Centre board. Brick Books published his poetry collection, Cries from the Ark. His work has appeared in many literary magazines, including Arc and Stand. Dan MacIsaac’s poetry has received awards including the Foley Prize from America Magazine. His work has been short-listed for the Walrus Poetry Prize and the CBC Short Story Prize.

His poem “Patrick Lane” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/patrick-lane-2/.

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store.