Author Spotlights

Emerging Scholars, Redux: Author – Fred Wah

April 22, 2021

Fred Wah is a BC poet who has published books of poetry, fiction, and criticism. His book of prose poems Waiting For Saskatchewan received the Governor General’s Award in 1986 and So Far was awarded the Stephanson Award for Poetry in 1992. Diamond Grill was published in 1996 and won the Howard O’Hagan Award for Short Fiction. Faking It: Poetics and Hybridity was awarded the Gabrielle Roy Prize for Writing in 2000 and is a door won the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize in 2009. Two recent poetry books involving collaborative projects are Sentenced to Light (2008) and, with Rita Wong, beholden: a poem as long as the river (2018), both published by Talonbooks. High Muck a Muck: Playing Chinese, An Interactive Poem, is available online (http://highmuckamuck.ca/). His most recent publication is Music at the Heart of Thinking: Improvisations 1-170 (Talonbooks, 2020)He lives in Vancouver and on Kootenay Lake.

His poem “Basalt” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/basalt/.

Canadian Literature issue 242, Emerging Scholars, Redux, is available to order through our online store at https://canlit.ca/support/purchase/single-issues/.


Emerging Scholars, Redux: Author – Shannon Claire Toll

April 15, 2021

Shannon Toll is an Assistant Professor of Indigenous Literatures and Cultures of North America at the University of Dayton. Her research interests include Native literary studies and theory, gender studies, performance studies, and film studies. Her work on contemporary Indigenous literature and performance has been featured in Transmotion (2019), Studies in American Indian Literatures (2018), and American Indian Culture and Research Journal (2015). Her current book manuscript, Oklahoma’s Indian Princesses: Native Women Performing Back to Power, studies the impact of modernist Indigenous Oklahoman women who performed as “Indian Princesses” in the early- to mid-twentieth century.

Article

“Disordering Enactments and (Re)mapping the Reserve in Rhymes for Young Ghouls

Abstract

This article discusses how Mi’gmaw director Jeff Barnaby’s 2013 film Rhymes for Young Ghouls embodies the horror of the residential school system and interrogates colonial schemas of space that brought it into fruition. It focuses on the protagonist Aila’s enactment of artistic (re)mappings and “disordering” refusals that upend the violent colonial geographies that shape life in the fictional Red Crow Reserve. By employing Mishuana Goeman’s term “(re)mapping” as a frame for examining the film’s use of speculative fiction and comic book aesthetics, this article demonstrates how Rhymes portrays the historical and ongoing traumas caused by these schools, while making space for a violent reckoning of its own.

Canadian Literature issue 242, Emerging Scholars, Redux, is available to order through our online store at https://canlit.ca/support/purchase/single-issues/.


Emerging Scholars, Redux: Author – Isabella Wang

April 8, 2021

Isabella Wang is the author of two poetry collections, On Forgetting a Language (Baseline Press 2019) and Pebble Swing (Nightwood Editions forthcoming 2021). She has been shortlisted for The Malahat Review‘s Far Horizons Poetry Contest, the Minola Review‘s inaugural Poetry Contest, and shortlisted twice for The New Quarterly‘s Edna Staebler Essay Contest. Her poetry and prose have appeared in over thirty literary journals, including Prism, The Fiddlehead, and Arc Poetry Magazine, and the Watch Your Head anthology (Coach House Press, ed. Kathryn Mockler). She is pursuing a double-major in English and World Literature at Simon Fraser University, and is the editor for issue 44.2 of Room magazine.

Her poem “Hindsight” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/hindsight/.

Canadian Literature issue 242, Emerging Scholars, Redux, is available to order through our online store at https://canlit.ca/support/purchase/single-issues/.


Emerging Scholars, Redux: Author Spotlight – Nicholas Bradley

April 1, 2021

Nicholas Bradley is an associate professor in the Department of English at the University of Victoria. He is the editor of An Echo in the Mountains: Al Purdy after a Century (2020), and an associate editor of Canadian Literature.

Article

“Huckleberries and HEPA Filters: Talking Place with Fred Wah”

Abstract

Fred Wah is a distinguished Canadian poet and critic, and a former Parliamentary Poet Laureate. In this interview, conducted in late 2020, Wah describes the personal and poetic importance of place—in particular, the Kootenay region of British Columbia—and the local or regional sensibilities of early peers and mentors, including Charles Olson. He discusses the expanded edition of his Music at the Heart of Thinking (2020), and the approach to poetic improvisation taken in that book. Wah also reflects upon the republication of his early works, and on recent projects, including beholden (2018), a poetic collaboration with Rita Wong.

Canadian Literature issue 242, Emerging Scholars, Redux, is available to order through our online store at https://canlit.ca/support/purchase/single-issues/.


Emerging Scholars, Redux: Author Spotlight – Kevin Spenst

March 25, 2021

Kevin Spenst is the author of the poetry collections Jabbering with Bing Bong (Anvil Press, 2015), Ignite (Anvil Press 2016), and Hearts Amok: A Memoir in Verse (Anvil Press 2020) along with over a dozen chapbooks including Pray Goodbye (the Alfred Gustav Press, 2013), Ward Notes (the serif of nottingham, 2016), Flip Flop Faces and Unexpurgated Lives (JackPine Press 2016), and Upend (Frog Hollow Press, 2018). He teaches poetry at Vancouver Community College and is an occasional co-host at Wax Poetic on Co-op Radio. He lives on unceded Coast Salish territory in Vancouver.

His poem “The Geology of a Moment” can be read on our website at  http://canlit.ca/article/the-geology-of-a-moment/.

Canadian Literature issue 242, Emerging Scholars, Redux, is available to order through our online store at https://canlit.ca/support/purchase/single-issues/.


Reading, Writing, Listening: Author Spotlight – Stan Rogal

February 18, 2021

Stan Rogal was born in Vancouver and now lives and writes in Toronto. Rogal’s work has appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies in Canada, the US, and Europe. The author of twenty-six books: seven novels, seven stories, and twelve poetry collections, as well as several chapbooks. Rogal has an MA in English from York University and has coordinated the popular Idler Pub Reading Series for ten years.

Stan Rogal’s poem “Ennui” can be read on our website at https://canlit.ca/article/ennui/.

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.


Reading, Writing, Listening: Author Spotlight – Michael Lithgow

February 11, 2021

Michael Lithgow’s poetry and writing have appeared in literary and academic journals including The / tEmz / Review, Poemeleon, Event, Literary Review of Canada, ARC Poetry, Cultural Trends, CV 2, Seismopolite, and TNQ. His first book of poetry, Waking in the Tree House, was shortlisted for the Quebec Writers Federation First Book Award. Work from this collection was included in the 2012 Best Canadian Poetry in English (Tightrope Books). His second collection, Who We Thought We Were As We Fell (Cormorant Books), will be out in spring 2021.

His poem “Tumbling in spring” can be read on our website at https://canlit.ca/article/tumbling-in-spring/.

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.


Reading, Writing, Listening: Author Spotlight – Dale Tracy

February 4, 2021

Dale Tracy, a contract faculty member, has been an assistant professor in the Department of English, Culture, and Communication and is currently associate chair of the Writing Centre at the Royal Military College. She is the author of With the Witnesses: Poetry, Compassion, and Claimed Experience (McGill-Queen’s, 2017) and the chapbooks Celebration Machine (Proper Tales, 2018) and The Mystery of Ornament (above/ground, 2020). She is guest editor of the special issue Metonymy, Poetics, Performance (Journal of the Midwest Modern Language Association, 2018), and her articles are available in diverse journals, including Canadian Literature, Modern Drama, World Literature, and Mosaic.

Article

“A Note—Doing the work with Metonymy: Three Insights from Canadian Theatre”

Abstract

Building on Alicia Elliott’s exhortation to “do the work” in “CanLit is a Raging Dumpster Fire,” I pursue the metonymic after the metaphoric. In metaphor, one thing substitutes for another: the dumpster fire takes the place of the field of relations that creates the conditions for controversies and crises. In contrast, metonymy is contiguous: its readability depends on showing the conventional, assumed, or actual relationships between one thing and another. Metaphor conceals connections; metonymy works by virtue of them. Three recent Canadian plays help me think about what metonymy can add to discourse about doing the work: Daniel MacIvor’s Who Killed Spalding Gray? (2017), Jess Dobkin’s The Magic Hour (2017), and Marcus Youssef and James Long’s Winners and Losers (2015). My strategy is metonymical like “CanLit” is: I read each play for an insight it might offer within the signifying field of Canadian literature, culture, and nation.

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.


Reading, Writing, Listening: Author Spotlight – Chelsea Coupal

January 28, 2021

Chelsea Coupal’s first poetry collection, Sedley (Coteau, 2018), was shortlisted for three Saskatchewan Book Awards and selected by Chapters Indigo for an Indigo Exclusive edition. She has won the City of Regina Writing Award and been shortlisted for CV2’s Young Buck Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared in Arc, Event, Grain, and Best Canadian Poetry 2019, among other publications.

Her poem “St. Peter’s Abbey, Muenster, Saskatchewan” can be read on our website at https://canlit.ca/article/st-peters-abbey-muenster-saskatchewan/

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.


Reading, Writing, Listening: Author Spotlight – Kristina Getz

January 21, 2021

Kristina Getz is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English at York University. Her dissertation, “Portraits of the Artist as Mother: Feminist Reconfigurations of the Maternal in Modern and Contemporary Canadian Literature,” employs feminist and maternal theory in order to explore the intersection of motherhood and creativity.

Article

“Alice Munro’s ‘Providence’ Second-Wave Feminism, and the (Im)possibilities of Reconciling Motherhood and Liberation”

Abstract

Amidst the theoretical and discursive landscape of 1970s liberationist feminism, Alice Munro published her 1978 short-story cycle, Who Do You Think You Are? The seventh story in the collection, “Providence,” remains one of the earliest examples of Canadian prose which explicitly explores the conflicts inherent to women’s experiences of feminist liberation and motherhood, and is among Munro’s least critically explored stories. “Providence” captures the tenuous and exquisite experience of single-mothering a young child, its difficulties and sacrifices, and the equally painful and (still) unspeakable choice to leave one’s maternal role behind. Munro’s central protagonist ultimately chooses feminist liberation over motherhood, unable to reconcile her desire for personal autonomy and freedom from the patriarchal family with her daughter’s need to be mothered.

Canadian Literature issue 241, Reading, Writing, Listening is available to order through our online store.