Author Spotlights

Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror : Author Spotlight – Rebecca Păpucaru

September 17, 2020

Rebecca Păpucaru’s short story “Yentas” won The Malahat Review‘s 2020 Novella Prize and will appear in the summer issue. Her short story, “Tropical Conversation” was shortlisted for the Penguin Random House Canada Student Award for Fiction. Her first book, The Panic Room, was awarded the 2018 Canadian Jewish Literary Award for Poetry and was also a finalist for the A. M. Klein Prize for Poetry and longlisted for the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award.

Her poem “Anti-depressant Pantoum” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/anti-depressant-pantoum/.

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – Y-Dang Troeung

September 10, 2020

Y-Dang Troeung is Assistant Professor in the Department of English Language and Literatures at the University of British Columbia. She specializes in transnational Asian literatures, Asian Canadian literature, critical refugee studies, and global south studies. Her work focuses on genealogies of colonialism, war, and militarism in the transpacific. She is currently completing a book manuscript on the afterlife of the Cold War in Cambodia. Her publications can be found in journals such as Modern Fiction Studies, Amerasia, ARIEL, MELUS, TOPIA, and Inter-Asia Cultural Studies.

Article

“’In this very uncertain space’:A Conversation with Omar El Akkad”

Abstract

As a journalist for The Globe and Mail for 10 years, El Akkad has reported on war and conflict from around the world, including the war in Afghanistan, the military trials at Guantanamo Bay, the Arab Spring revolution in Egypt, and the Black Lives Matter movement in Ferguson, Missouri. In 2018, El Akkad’s debut novel, American War, was shortlisted for a number of prominent literary prizes, garnering public attention as a finalist on the CBC Canada Reads competition. In this conversation, we talk to El Akkad about his novel, journalism, literary influences, migrations, and political visions of the future. One recurring theme in the conversation is the relationship between violence and the production of uncertainty—the unpredictability movement and refuge for the displaced; the ambiguity and risks of racial representation; the secrecy of detention and redaction; and the uncertainties of the future in times of change and crisis.

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store.


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – Lauren Nerfa

September 3, 2020

Lauren Nerfa is a PhD student at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. She focuses on cultural perceptions of and interactions with landscapes, community well-being, and ecological conservation in tropical forests. Born in British Columbia and raised in the Caribbean and central Canada, Lauren is at home in the temperate zone and the tropics. She draws inspiration for her poetry from the beauty of landscapes and philosophical traditions from around the world.

Her poem “Gift” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/gift/.

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror, is available to order through our online store.


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – Larissa Lai

August 27, 2020

Larissa Lai is the author of six books, including the novels Salt Fish Girl and The Tiger Flu, and the monograph Slanting I, Imagining We: Asian Canadian Literary Production in the 1980s and 1990s. Recipient of the Lambda Literary Award, the Astraea Award, and the Tiptree Honor Book Award and finalist for the ACQL Gabrielle Roy Prize for Literary Criticism and seven more, she lives on Treaty Seven Territory in southern Alberta, where she holds a Canada Research Chair in the Department of English at the University of Calgary and directs The Insurgent Architects’ House for Creative Writing.

Article

“Familiarizing Grist Village: Why I Write Speculative Fiction”

 

Abstract

Larissa Lai explains that she writes speculative fiction in order to embrace her own writerly agency. She takes up the practice of the thought experiment, first envisioned by Ursula LeGuin, as a way of narratively testing out ideas that could be practiced in the world as it is. Lai adds to this by recognizing that the world changes in multiple ways at once, and that we get new worlds and fresh futures not through a single change but through the concatenation of many, often driven by differing ideals. We can’t predict the results of ideals interacting, but we can learn to recognize beautiful, freeing or interesting things when they emerge. The marvel of speculative fiction is that it can show us how this might work, as for example in The Tiger Flu, Lai’s novel about a community of self-reproducing women and a disease that favours men.

 

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store.


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror: Author Spotlight – Maureen Moynagh

August 20, 2020

Maureen Moynagh is Professor in the Department of English at St. Francis
Xavier University, in Mi’kma’ki, the unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq. She teaches postcolonial literature and theory, and she has published in the areas of African and African Diaspora literatures, transnational feminist collaborations, anti-imperialist travel writing, and child-soldier narratives. She received the Joe Weixlmann prize of 2019 for a recent essay about Nalo Hopkinson’s speculative fiction, published in the African American Review.

Her editorial can be read on our website at link https://canlit.ca/article/introduction-decolonial-revisions-of-science-fiction-fantasy-and-horror/

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store at https://canlit.ca/support/purchase/single-issues/.


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – Lou Cornum

August 13, 2020

Lou Cornum is a Diné writer born in Arizona and living now in Brooklyn, New York. They received their Masters Degree in English literature from the University of British Columbia and are currently an English literature PhD candidate at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Their dissertation is titled Skin Worlds: Science Fiction Theorizing in Black and Indigenous Science Fiction since the 1970s.

Their editorial can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/introduction-decolonial-revisions-of-science-fiction-fantasy-and-horror/

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror, is available to order through our online store.


60th Anniversary Author Spotlight – Adrian De Leon

April 21, 2020

Adrian De Leon is an Abagatan (Southern) Ilokano writer and teacher from Manila by way of Scarborough. He is the author of Rouge (2018) and barangay (forthcoming 2021), and co-editor of FEEL WAYS: A Scarborough Anthology (2020). After receiving a BA in English (2014) and PhD in History (2019) at the University of Toronto, Adrian is now an Assistant Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. He lives in Los Angeles.

His poem “I, Wound” can be read on our website at canlit.ca/article/i-wound.

Canadian Literature issue 239, 60th Anniversary, is available to order through our online store.


60th Anniversary Author Spotlight – David Martin

April 14, 2020

David Martin works as a literacy instructor in Calgary and as an organizer for the Single Onion Poetry Series. His first collection, Tar Swan (NeWest Press, 2018), was a finalist for the Raymond Souster Award and the City of Calgary W. O. Mitchell Book Prize. David’s work was awarded the CBC Poetry Prize in 2014.

His poem “The Canals of Mars” can be read on our website at canlit.ca/article/the-canals-of-mars.

Canadian Literature issue 239, 60th Anniversary, is available to order through our online store.


60th Anniversary Author Spotlight – Sally Chivers

April 7, 2020

Sally Chivers is Director of the Trent Centre for Aging and Society and Professor of English and Gender & Women’s Studies at Trent University. She is the author of The Silvering Screen: Old Age and Disability in Cinema (2011) and From Old Woman to Older Women: Contemporary Culture and Women’s Narratives (2003), and the co-editor of Care Home Stories: Aging, Disability and Long-Term Residential Care (2017) and The Problem Body: Projecting Disability and Film (2010). Her ongoing research focuses on the cultural politics of disability and aging, especially through literature and film.

 

Article
“‘Your own guilty story’: Rethinking Care Relations through David Chariandy’s Soucouyant

Abstract
Apocalyptic visions of an aging population rest on negative assumptions about the costs and effects of increasing numbers of people with dementia. Such discourse emphasizes a desire for cure and amplifies the costs of care while ignoring the broader cultural implications of dementia. Literary portrayals offer the opportunity to broaden the figurative landscape to raise questions about what it means for a population to age. Drawing on age studies, this contextualized close reading of David Chariandy’s Soucouyant: a novel of forgetting offers another way to think about global aging, the implications of memory loss, and how care work affects relationships. The novel’s never named narrator concocts “guilty stories” that orient him to his mother’s dementia but do not adequately account for the care work his mother’s friend, Mrs. Christopher, has done over decades. Thus, the novel pertains to the political economy of aging by surfacing connections among care relations, cultural memory, and dementia.

Canadian Literature issue 239, 60th Anniversary, is available to order through our online store.


60th Anniversary Author Spotlight – Franco Cortese

March 31, 2020

Franco Cortese is an experimental poet living in Thorold, Ontario. His poetry was longlisted for the 2019 CBC Poetry Prize and has appeared in Literary Review of Canada, The Malahat Review, Canadian Literature, The Capilano Review, filling Station, ditch, and others. His recent chapbooks include aeiou (No Press 2018), uoiea (above/ground press 2019), teksker (Simulacrum Press 2019), no mỡ, no mo, no mò (nOIR:Z 2020), lo vỡ yo uo (above/ground press 2020), wú hu uu mù iu (above/ground press, 2020), gó go gó (The Blasted Tree 2020), lő co co lỗ (Timglaset, 2020) and lù vũ yǔ (Timglaset 2020). He also has leaflets, booklets and other poetic ephemera out through The Blasted Tree, Penteract Press, and Spacecraft Press. His work has been published both within Canada and internationally, and has been anthologized in Concrete and Constraint (Penteract Press 2018) and Science Poems (Penteract Press 2020).

His poem “errorgatio*” can be read on our website at canlit.ca/article/errorgatio.

Canadian Literature issue 239, 60th Anniversary, is available to order through our online store.