Author Spotlights

Verse Forward: Poetry on the Frontlines: Author Spotlight—Isabella Wang

November 10, 2020

Isabella Wang is the author of two poetry collections, On Forgetting a Language (Baseline Press, 2019) and Pebble Swing (Nightwood Editions, forthcoming 2021). Her poetry and prose have appeared in over thirty literary journals and are forthcoming in four anthologies. She is the Editor for issue 44.2 of Room magazine.

Come hear Isabella Wang speak on November 25, 2020 at 7:00p.m. (PST) at the inaugural event of Canadian Literature’s new reading series, “Verse Forward: Poetry on the Front Line.” Register here bit.ly/VerseFwd!


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – Jody Mason

November 5, 2020

Jody Mason is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at Carleton University. She has published two books, Writing Unemployment: Worklessness, Mobility, Citizenship in Twentieth-Century Canadian Literatures (U of Toronto P, 2013) and Home Feelings: Liberal Citizenship and the Canadian Reading Camp Movement (McGill-Queen’s UP, 2019), as well as numerous articles on topics related to literature and print culture in Canada. She is currently working on a critical history of the cultural industries-creative economy shift in late twentieth-century Canada.

Article

“Canadian Postwar Book Diplomacy and Settler Contradiction”

Abstract

A standard narrative in the literary history of English Canada is that literary culture was able to “develop” in the wake of the 1951 Massey Report, finally “arriving” in the years between the late 1950s and the mid-1970s. This essay offers another view of this period, analyzing not the smooth developmental momentum but rather the contradiction and disavowal that attended one of the federal government’s first direct forms of support for the book, which came in the form of postwar book diplomacy efforts. Using Anna Johnston and Allan Lawson’s theorization of settler colonialism, the essay analyzes how these book diplomacy undertakings exemplify the “double inscription of authority and authenticity” of settler contradiction. As the Imperium shifted across the Atlantic in the decade that followed the close of the Second World War, the settler nation struggled to locate itself anew in relation to its doubled, desired, and disavowed origins.

 

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store.


Verse Forward: Poetry on the Frontlines: Author Spotlight–Kevin Spenst

November 3, 2020

Kevin Spenst is the author of IgniteJabbering with Bing Bong, and Hearts Amok: A Memoir in Verse (Anvil Press) as well as over a dozen chapbooks. He teaches Creative Writing at Vancouver Community College and lives in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish territory with the love of his life Shauna Kaendo.

Come hear Kevin Spenst speak on November 25, 2020 at 7:00p.m. (PST) at the inaugural event of Canadian Literature‘s new reading series, “Verse Forward: Poetry on the Front Lines.” Register here bit.ly/VerseFwd!


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – Barry Dempster

October 29, 2020

Barry Dempster is twice nominated for the Governor General’s Award, author of sixteen poetry collections, two novels, and three previous books of stories. His poetry collection The Burning Alphabet won the Canadian Author’s Association Award for Poetry. In 2014 he was shortlisted for the Trillium Award for his novel, The Outside World.

His poem “Your Poisoned Life” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/your-poisoned-life/.

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store.


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – George Elliott Clarke

October 22, 2020

Photo Credit: Harvard University

The inaugural E. J. Pratt Poet/Professor, of Canadian Literature, at the University of Toronto, George Elliott Clarke hails from Black Nova Scotia (Africadia). He has served as Poet Laureate of Toronto (2012-15) and Parliamentary Poet Laureate (2016-17).

Article

“Imagining an Africa That Never Was: The Anti-Racist / Anti-Imperialist Fantasy of Charles R. Saunders’ Imaro and its Basis in the Africentric Occult—A Note”

Abstract

Despite the cautions of Frantz Fanon (and others), Afrocentrists have continued to mine the African past to find and assert proof of Black Genius and achievement to refute the Negrophobic propaganda of White Supremacy. African-Canadian Fantasy-genre novelist Charles R. Saunders follows an African-American precursor–Frank Yerby–in limning a pre-Transatlantic Slave Trade Africa that is magical–either in authorial imagination or in actual history.  While these approaches to writing Africa may instill greater pride and self-awareness in, presumably, black readers, both Saunders and Yerby also simply “blacken,” as it were, the racialist imaginings of white authors like Edgar Rice Burroughs, whose strictures would have found support from Euro-American occult beliefs. In a sense, though striving to author a literature of Black Pride, both Saunders and Yerby integrate themselves with Euro-American occult fantasies. Yet, such may be the contradictory conceptualization of “Afrocentrism.”

 

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store.


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – Vivian Zenari

October 15, 2020

Vivian Zenari is the author of Biome, a recently completed collection of poetry about Alberta’s natural regions, from which her poem “Crowsnest Flow” is taken. Her novel Beth and Ralph’s Children is forthcoming from Inanna Publications. Zenari lives in Edmonton.

Her poem “Crowsnest Flow” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/crowsnest-flow/.

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror : Author Spotlight – Miasol Eguíbar-Holgado

October 8, 2020

Miasol Eguíbar-Holgado holds a degree in English Philology from the University of Oviedo, Spain. In 2011, she followed a Master’s Degree on American Literatures in Trinity College, Dublin and she was awarded her PhD in 2015 from the University of Oviedo, for which she received a pre-doctoral scholarship. She currently works as Assistant Lecturer in English in the same university. Her research focuses on Afro-Canadian literature and postcolonial speculative fiction.

Article

“Re-framing the diasporic Subject: The Supernatural and the Black Female Body in The Salt Roads

Abstract

This article proposes to analyse Nalo Hopkinson’s novel The Salt Roads (2003). It looks at how its intersections with gender, sexuality, and race adds new, unexplored dimensions to the spec-fic genre. More specifically, it examines how the use of the Afro-Caribbean supernatural and of the black female body in the novel, creates a redefinition of Afro-diasporic subjectivities. In many respects this novel departs from the Eurocentric concept of the diaspora and from received epistemologies in the understanding of culture and history. Instead, it creates an alternative set of routes, the salt roads, that relies on a female water spirit as unifying thread. A focus on the enslaved female black body and on relationships of solidarity among the main characters implies a subversion of the traditional heterosexual male roles that dominate works of speculative fiction. Moreover, it creates an imaginative space that redresses traditional, Western readings of Caribbean history and identity.

 

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store.


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – Lisa Arsenault

October 1, 2020

Lisa Arsenault’s first poetry manuscript, working title “The Terrorist: A Book of Love Poems” is complete and she is working towards publication. Music has heavily influenced the manuscript’s rhythm and tone: from Beethoven, Mozart, Black Sabbath’s first five albums, Garbage’s Version 2 album, Genesis, Eagles, Soundgarden, Audioslave, and Chris Cornell. She is writing a second manuscript, “Nail’er Assault,” an anagram of her name. Lisa Arsenault is from Timmins, Ontario, and has a B.A. in Psychology from York University.

Her poem “Forgotten Jasmine” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/forgotten-jasmine/.

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store.


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Author Spotlight – Moritz Ingwersen

September 24, 2020

Moritz Ingwersen is Assistant Professor of North American Literature and Culture at the University of Konstanz, Germany. He holds a joint PhD in Cultural Studies and English from Trent University, Ontario and the University of Cologne. Building on a dissertation on intersections of science fiction and science studies, his research and teaching focus on speculative fiction, the posthumanities, ecological criticism, and North American Indigenous literatures. His publications include articles on J. G. Ballard, China Miéville, N. K. Jemisin, and Neal Stephenson.

Article

“Reclaiming Fossil Ghosts: Indigenous Resistance to Resource Extraction in Works by Warren Cariou, Cherie Dimaline, and Nathan Adler”

Abstract

Against the backdrop of recent Anthropocene critiques, this article offers a discussion of Indigenous resistance to resource extraction in Warren Cariou’s “An Athabasca Story” (2012), Cherie Dimaline’s The Marrow Thieves (2017), and Nathan Niigan Noodin Adler’s Wrist (2016). Employing elements of gothic, horror, and science fiction, all three works invoke modes of human-geologic enmeshment to imagine Indigenous resistance to settler-colonial fossil fuel industries via the resurgence of fossils who refuse to be commodified. Building on the theoretical work of Kathryn Yusoff and others, I examine their mobilization of fossil metaphors as emancipatory expressions of a type of geologic subjectivity that generates a dislocation of Eurocentric demarcations between the human and the inhuman. Reclaiming fossils, I argue, implies a material-discursive dimension of decolonization that complements the physical repatriation of looted ancestral bones and Indigenous artifacts with the production of self-determined Indigenous narratives of geologic corporeality.

 

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store.


Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror : Author Spotlight – Rebecca Păpucaru

September 17, 2020

Rebecca Păpucaru’s short story “Yentas” won The Malahat Review‘s 2020 Novella Prize and will appear in the summer issue. Her short story, “Tropical Conversation” was shortlisted for the Penguin Random House Canada Student Award for Fiction. Her first book, The Panic Room, was awarded the 2018 Canadian Jewish Literary Award for Poetry and was also a finalist for the A. M. Klein Prize for Poetry and longlisted for the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award.

Her poem “Anti-depressant Pantoum” can be read on our website at http://canlit.ca/article/anti-depressant-pantoum/.

Canadian Literature issue 240, Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror, is available to order through our online store