Articles



Waiting for Asian Canada: Fred Wah’s Transnational Aesthetics
Abstract: Fred Wah's 1985 Waiting for Saskatchewan offers a snapshot of the emergence of an Asian Canadian aesthetic, providing a genealogy that positions Asian Canadian writing at the nexus of transnational flows from China, Japan, and the United States, while also emphasizing the cross-ethnic coalitions that give rise to the category of the Asian Canadian in the 1970s and 1980s. Waiting for Saskatchewan offers a complex constellation of Chinese content, Japanese forms, and U.S. aesthetic mediation that nonetheless takes as its “centre” a small Canadian prairie town. The forms of Waiting, from Olsonian projective poetics to the Japanese haibun, reveal Asian Canada as a process of transnational convergence, a dialogic space that is always being rewritten across national borders.

Waiting for the Messiah
Abstract: IIF I HAD то ATTRIBUTE to any one event in my life the fur- ther unfolding of that life, I ...

West of the Great Divide
Abstract: IASHIONS IN LITERARY CRITICISM change rapidly. The “sur- vival” thesis that has dominated the thematic criticism of Canadian literature in ...

West of the Great Divide
Abstract: I N THAT LITTLE CLASSIC of coastal literature, M. Wylie Blan- chet’s The Curve of Time, there is an episode ...

Western Myth
Abstract: “RALPH CONNOR” is a name which is virtually lost in the mists of time. Apart from librarians and specialists in ...

Western Panorama
Abstract: ΤLHOUGH THE NOVELS of Robert J. G. Stead have received some notice from the historians of Canadian literature, especially in ...

What Happened to Pauline?
Abstract: A EVERYONE INTERESTED in Canadian literary history knows, the Pauline Johnson centennial was celebrated last year; indeed, the more obvious ...

What Kroetsch Said
Abstract: wITÈRE IT NOT FOR ROBERT KROETSCH’S generous attitude towardthecritic’srole,itwouldseemanactofhubristoattempttointerpret What ψ TERE the Crow Said, the novel that he wrote ...

What Stories Do
Abstract: The title of Episkenew’s Taking Back Our Spirits, as a verb-based phrase, emphasizes the working assumption that this book makes ...

What Stories Do: A Response to Episkenew
Abstract: Part 3 of "Thinking Together: A Forum on Jo-Ann Episkenew’s Taking Back Our Spirits: Indigenous Literature, Public Policy, and Healing."

The original live forum on Jo-Ann Episkenew’s Taking Back Our Spirits: Indigenous Literature, Public Policy, and Healing brought together the author of only the second monograph by an Indigenous literary critic in Canada with three critics, who discussed her recently published work in front of members of the Canadian Association of Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies (CACLALS) and the Association of Bibliotherapy and Applied Literatures (IABAL). Following the live event, the panelists submitted written versions of their contributions to the convenors of the forum, allowing all centrally involved to reflect further on the thoughts of the other panelists and of those in the audience who offered further ideas.