Articles



“Streets are the dwelling place of the collective”: Public Space and Cosmopolitan Citizenship in Dionne Brand’s What We All Long For
Abstract: span style=”font: 14.0px Helvetica;”>In Dionne Brand’s novel What We All Long For, the identity of diasporic characters in the hostland ...

“The Coded Dots of Life”: Carol Shields’s Diaries and Stones
Abstract: Speaking of her childhood reading, Carol Shields notes her attachment to Anne of Green Gables: “Anne transforms her com- munity ...

“The Collected Works of Billy the Kid”: Scripting the Docudrama
Abstract: IN HER 1969 ARTICLE, “The Documentary Poem : A Canadian Genre,” Dorothy Livesay announced the existence of a class of ...

“The Empathetic Imagination”: An Interview with Yann Martel
Abstract: To date, Yann Martel has published three books: The Facts Behind the Helsinki Roccamatios (1993), a collection of short stories awarded ...

“The Missionary Position”: Feminism and Nationalism in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale
Abstract: VWhenMargaretAtwood’sTheHandmaid’sTalewas published in 1985 it was to an almost unanimous adulation. The novel won Atwood her second Canadian Governor-General’s Award, ...

“The Other Side of Things”: Notes on Clark Blaise’s “Notes Beyond History”
Abstract: 1!NA STATEMENT THAT SERVES to describe his own art, Clark Blaise says A writer is always trying to suggest the ...

“The Perfect Voice”: Mauberley as Narrator in Timothy Findley’s “Famous Last Words”
Abstract: 1IN, final days writing on the walls of the Grand Elysium Hotel his eyewitness account of the activities of famous ...

“The poem of you will never be written”: Memoir and the Contradictions of Elegiac Form in Patrick Lane’s There Is a Season
Abstract: This article examines the use of elegiac motifs in Patrick Lane’s 2004 memoir, There Is a Season, in which an overt addiction recovery narrative is combined with elegiac reflections on Lane’s relationship with his mother. Looking at the memoir alongside two of Lane’s elegies, “Mother” and “The Last Day of My Mother,” the article argues that Lane’s complex and often contradictory approach to elegiac consolation conveys a central ambivalence about the ethics of recovering and representing his mother’s life and death, a dilemma that reflects both their difficult relationship and the problematic gender roles inherent in the elegiac tradition. At the same time, There Is a Season also explores the limited possibilities of recovery and consolation available within its prose adaptation of elegiac forms, illustrating the significance of these formal borrowings for the memoir genre more broadly.

“The Simple Adventures of a Memsahib” and the Prisonhouse of Language
Abstract: “Here, you see, sir, all the chairs,” stated the little baboo, waving his hand. ” I must tell you, sir, ...

“The Story of Rehearsal Never Ends”: Rehearsal, Performance, Identity in Settler Culture Drama
Abstract: W h i l e Canada’s recent re-assessment of the nature of its nationhood in the 1992 referendum is one ...