Articles



Convergence/Éclatement: L’Immigrant au risque de la perte de soi dans la nouvelle “Où iras-tu Sam Lee Wong?” de Gabrielle Roy
Abstract: L»A DIVERSITÉ CULTURELLE ET ETHNIQUE des immigrants de l’Ouest canadien peuple les récits manitobains de Gabrielle Roy. Dans son auto- ...

Copy Paste Publish: On Appropriation

Copyright and Poetry in Twenty-First-Century Canada: Poets’ Incomes and Fair Dealing
Abstract: Twenty-first-century Canada has shifted its definition of copyright to give more weight to fair dealing and to users’ rights. Copying original, recently published works without the permission of the copyright owner is thus more explicitly legal than ever before in Canada. The purpose of this essay is to discuss the significance of this historic shift for the unique case of poetry. What effect will the redefinition of fair dealing have on Canadian poetry? Should teachers provide free copies of poems to their students? How important are royalties to poetic creativity? How do contemporary poets make a living, and how does copyright contribute to it? From 2014 to 2015, I directed a survey of approximately fifty active Canadian poets to gather evidence on their sources of revenue and the utility of copyright as they see it. The results indicate that, while the poets unanimously cherish moral rights in their work, the direct commercial benefits of ownership, as measured by the sales of authorized copies, are so low as to be almost negligible. Nevertheless, ownership retains indirect value, in that it provides a framework for the subsidization of poetry. In light of these findings, it is reasonable to advance a complex model for the production of Canadian poetry, one that prizes the established system of government grants for creative writing and authorized book publishing, but that also recognizes the good that comes of unauthorized copying. State sponsorship and fair dealing are compatible tiers in the economics of poetry.

Corrosive Aesthetics: On the Receiving End of Oil and Gas in Who by Fire
Abstract: I. Lighting the Match In Fred Stenson’s 2014 work of petrofiction, Who by Fire, pyric imagery assumes striking visual form ...

Countries Like Drawbridges: Chilean-Canadian Writing Today
Abstract: T h e Canadian edition of a collection of Nain Nômez’ poetry is called Burning Bridges, whereas the book’s original ...

Coureurs-de-bois, Voyageurs, & Trappers: The Fur Trade and the Emergence of an Ignored Canadian Literary Tradition
Abstract: A,LLTHOUGH THE TOPIC OF THE FUR TRADE was the most popular stock-in-trade in earlier Canadian literature, literary criticism has largely ...

Coyote as Trickster in The Double Hook
Abstract: I OR A SMALL BOOK, Sheila Watson’s The Double Hook con- tains so many implications and allusions that some readers ...

Coyote Pedagogy: Knowing Where the Borders Are in Thomas King’s Green Grass, Running Water
Abstract: The most striking effect of Green Grass, Running Water is its ability to arouse readers’ desire to “get” the in-jokes, ...

Creating the Girl from God’s Country: From Nell Shipman to Sharon Pollock
Abstract: She experiences her life by telling stories about her life that living her life never gave her. Meaning is derived ...

Creolizing Narratives across Languages: Selvon and Chamoiseau
Abstract: Ihave never thought of myself as an ’exile’ [. . .].I carried my little island with me, and far from ...